biray@instructure.com

BoG 4/11/2016: Collabulous Edition

Blog Post created by biray@instructure.com on Apr 11, 2016

When people collab, it's just so fab! Or, perhaps it's just 'collabulous'! Either way, collaboration, when done purposefully and with direction, can yield amazing resources and outcomes. And 'documents' are one of the content types in the community that allow for member collaboration. Below is a list of documents where the authors have frame worked the content to allow for community collaboration. Read and see if you can pitch it to build one of these resources.

NOTE: Technically, all documents created within community groups can be edited by any member of the group (unless specifically restricted by the author).

Organized Feedback

Similar to a Google doc or spreadsheet, it's good to have a document that curates feedback on one topic or a series of related topics in an organized way. Often times when you ask for feedback via a discussion post, comments can get lost in the threaded conversations. For example, Canvas Rollout, Training, and Adoption Strategies document started off as a compilation from a past InstructureCon pre-session facilitated by Jordan Dayton. He had asked participants to provide tips on all aspects Canvas - from Canvas first steps and marketing tips to campus-wide trainings and continued incentives. It now lives in the Canvas User Engagement group where you can continue editing by adding you own tips under specific category headings!

 

Similarly, Jared Ward's collaborative document, Badging Platforms for Canvas in the Gamification group, is organized by different platforms. It is meant for users to provide their feedback, reviews and ideas related to their experiences with listed Canvas badging platforms. Again, another easy way to get feedback in an organized fashion.

 

List or Compilation

Sometimes collaborative docs are used to compile a list of goodness. For example, a list of Open Content Providers or Open Tools, two collaborative documents in the Open Education group. Another great example of this is the Course Design Resource Index in the Instructional Designers group. I imagine there are a lot of good discussions in the community that can be gleaned for a collaborative doc.

 

Resource Curation

If you're very active in the community, then you are likely to notice similar and/or related content across the community. In these situations, a curated collaborative document is very helpful to bring together these resources into one place. Checkout Resources for teaching math in Canvas, a comprehensive list of discussions, resources, and other useful information from the Community related to using Math in Canvas, started by Kona Jones in the Teaching Math in Canvas group. Stefanie Sanders also has a great curated resource entitled Canvas Commons for Master Courses in the Instructional Designers group. (NOTE: it is written as a blog post, which means it is not collaborative like documents. However, you could easily post your comments to make suggestions to her existing content.)

 

TAKE ACTION!

Here are some tips to creating collaborative resources in the community:

  1. CREATE a collaborative document in a group to create a resource that either 1) organizes feedback, 2) creates a list or compilation or 3) curates existing resources in the community.
  2. CONTRIBUTE to a collaborative (or any) document in a group by clicking 'edit' on the right-side of the document.
  3. FOLLOW a collaborative document. Clicking 'follow' will notify you of any and all version changes!

 

Have a productive week, everyone!

 

Biray

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