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2019

It's here tweets Ryan Seilhamer

and Sharon Oxford agrees with a hearty email about how easy it is to use.  So how are you using it? Please help us get the word out.  You wanted it and Canvas delivered.  Let's keep suggesting new ideas and voting them up.  It is great to have a platform that changes to meet our users both teachers and students. What other features do we need to discuss? 

 

- Many thanks on behalf of many teachers. 

Do mobile apps for students utilize LTI tools that are applied to a school's instance?

If we have added LTI tools, like ReadSpeaker to our Canvas instances, do those tools carryover to the Mobile App experience? 

 

 

ryan.cloyd@unco.edu

Managing To Dos

Posted by ryan.cloyd@unco.edu May 6, 2019

I've been pretty happy with the Canvas mobile app, but have noticed that there seems to be no real way of managing To Do notifications through the Canvas mobile app. I have the To Do notifications show up and can click on them, but they don't go away or mark as completed. I'm all about getting to a zero-inbox in terms of zero notification numbers on my app (which keeps throwing me when I see something on Canvas mobile as an instructor that I can only get rid of by logging in on a computer and marking them as complete). I guess I was wondering if anyone else has had this happen? This isn't dire or even really a big issue, but it's something I noticed and figured it was worth a small blog.

Nicholas Jones

Lights, Camera, Learn

Posted by Nicholas Jones May 3, 2019

I get excited about mobile learning because it opens up possibilities inside the classroom and outside the classroom. I believe that mobile devices, when used strategically with clear boundaries, can operate on all four levels of the SAMR technology model. I want to share two examples of mobile learning that have inspired me.

 

Teaching Optics

 

I have invested some time into the research on videoconferencing tools. Most of the time, that research is merely trying to prove that videoconferencing and distance learning are as effective as in-person instruction (short answer: it is). However, one researcher's work explored a fascinating way to implement mobile videoconferencing in a face-to-face teaching environment. Researchers Ting, Tai, Tseng, and Tsai published their paper Innovative Use of Mobile Video Conferencing in Face-to-Face Collaborative Science Learning: The Case of Reflection in Optics in 2018 where they examined using mobile devices to teach middle schoolers about the physical properties of light.

 

Typically we look for ways to incorporate hands-on learning to get students engaged, especially if we can get them to personally experience the principles we're covering. Optics has a unique problem, though. The way you perceive light being warped, reflected, and refracted by different surfaces is entirely contingent upon where you are standing in relation to the light source and the surface. The moment you move, the interaction changes. For a young child, this is difficult to explain. All they know is that this is what the light looks right now, which is different from how it looked a minute ago.

 

So, the researchers setup the optics lesson to center around videoconferencing. Students would partner up, mobile devices in hand, and would assume different positions around the light/glass/surface assemblage. Then, they would videoconference each other and point their cameras at the setup. This allowed students to see that the same setup could produce two radically different optic effects based on your position around the activity. Mobile devices enabled a lesson in a way that would not physically be possible otherwise.

 

Augmented Reality

 

Apps like Aurasma incorporate augmented reality into regular lessons without requiring radical changes to the lesson structure. Here's an example I found compelling: students were given coloring sheets that depicted all the components of a cell. Once students finished coloring the illustration, they could point a tablet at the drawing and an app would turn the drawing into a 3-dimensional diagram. The trick is that the app would pull the students' coloring and map it onto the 3-d object. If Suzy painted her mitochondria orange, she saw orange. If Timmy painted one of his mitochondria pink and another green, he'd see pink and green. This is so much more powerful than a standard diagram. It provides students the opportunity to organically and independently identify the various components of a cell without having to worry about the technical names. Then, students can learn the proper names for different components using a model that they themselves participated in creating.

 

Can mobile devices be distracting in a classroom? Sure. Does that mean we should ignore them? I hope these two applications show why the answer is "no." When used with purpose and limits, mobile devices can enrich learning.

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