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Instructional Designers

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It is in our best interest to ask ourselves clarifying questions as we struggle with design puzzles. Are we pursuing the right solution? Are we even focused on the right problem? 

Every improvement helps. That said, it is tempting to want a slick, impressive layout for a course when the real need is better content. It is tempting to want greater speed building course content when the real need is a better UX plan with a student-centered rationale. We sometimes want our courses to be more entertaining when they really need to be less confusing. 

"The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency. The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency."

Bill Gates

Innovations in technology are changing our world faster than futurists can line up to predict what is next in business or education trends. Anyone who is old enough to remember standing in line to register for a college course or life before Google knows that there is no going back, and we don't want to. Nostalgia for what is lost has little value until it contributes to what is next.

"Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see." Arthur Schopenhauer

Examining trends in Leadership and Organizational Communication reveals familiar, deceptively simple issues with severe impact. Organizational growing pains are utterly predictable and unavoidable, yet they stand as a somewhat positive marker of success. Growth is good, right? Unfortunately, growth is also laden with missed opportunities and unaddressed issues that grow as companies grow, with deep roots and scaling repercussions.

Solutions may be counter-intuitive to leaders because the same skills and vision needed to create successful companies can become the precise limiting factors for stable growth. Most companies and innovations would not exist without a leader's skills and attitudes, yet these same entrepreneurial skills often require being consciously set aside in order for organizations to move to the next level. Case in point is one of my favorite user experience UX heroes--and cautionary tale--Steve Jobs. 

Playing to Your Strengths versus Tackling Your Growth Edges

Long before documentaries, books, and feature films charted Jobs' amazing comeback and world-changing innovations, he was also a scary Silicon Valley poster-boy for purging hugely-successful companies of their founders in order to reach the next level. His maniacally-long work hours cut down legions of talented employees through burnout. Since stability and balance were not his virtues, he did not value it in the people around him. Converting the public to his elegant taste seemingly led rise to a belief that the rest of his decisions were infallible as well. Which, of course, they were not.

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One takeaway is: Whatever skillset leaders use to create their companies will tend to be over-used. Eventually, those same overused skills will aggravate the lingering weaknesses. Organizational needs may change and mature. The temptation is for leaders to just add more of what worked before. After all, it works! Until it doesn't.

For contrast, consider Starbucks' Howard Schultz who is generally lauded as a visionary leader. He was gracious enough to acknowledge a tough phase for his company when they had reached a peak of success and were risking a crash due to losing touch with customer feedback. (Check out fascinating interviews with Schultz and other thought leaders.) In a nutshell: An entrepreneurial founder tends to keep momentum by ignoring distractions from naysayers and charging ahead with a vision, inspiring people to join along the way. When that same company is a success, leaders do not readily change gears. 

Addressing the Little Things

Starbucks grew fast, outrunning feedback from customers and low-level employees while essentially labeling any unpleasant news as coming from complainers and their "negativity." Then the business was blindsided by the realities of shop closures as organized protests smeared the company image. Starbucks' growth and global reputation teetered until they reconsidered their strategies and the limiting attitudes toward feedback and complaints that were now embedded throughout the company.

Not surprisingly, a leader's attitudes become the organization's attitudes for better or worse. If the boss does not value customer complaints, no one else is motivated to accept feedback either. Starbucks re-blossomed when top brass gathered people with varying skill sets to manage communications and invited input from every employee. Now, each Starbucks Barista is considered the top advertiser and the top investment for retaining customer loyalty. 

Making room for complementary skills--not complimentary--is the mark of a mature leader. (See the book: The Top Ten Mistakes Leaders Make.) Leaders get successful by paying their dues, often fighting distractions to their vision and supplying the bulk of effort to successfully create a new product or innovate at the foundational level. Continued growth beyond a launch can be treacherous territory unless conscious effort is expended to stabilize and solidify innovation.

This ideal of stable growth is the product of cooperation from teams who duplicate the passion, but not the methods or personality of the original leader. Bold leaders set themselves apart when they cultivate differences, including skills and viewpoints they lack. Fine-tuning and addressing the little things like user complaints, employee ideas, and unpleasant feedback stabilizes organizations through the dangers of fast growth. Sometimes these small adjustments move beyond stabilizing and open the flood-gates for exponential growth, therefore, valuing interaction and openness is the next level of growth leadership. 

In the UX process of discovering what is useful and usable, learning moments (*mistakes) have an upside: lots of cautionary examples to share. Enjoy this selection of standout bloopers and rookie mistakes.

The iterative worlds of SAM, Agile, and ADDIE invite a continual balancing act between "get it done" versus "get it right." -Rachael Sweeten
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  • Asking your users to design the product. Looks like designers taking the users' orders. Sounds like, "If I give them exactly what they asked for, then they'll have to be happy."
  • User relies on the "Back" button. Puhleeez.
  • User is completely stuck. Excruciating.
  • Blaming the user. Sounds like, "They aren't tech savvy," or "They just need to learn how to do this." * The user has probably just learned to hate your product and to distrust you. 
  • Shaming the user. Sounds like, "C'mon. This is really easy." *Remember, everything is intuitive for the person who designs it. 
  • Breaking the 4, no more, rule. Long feedback forms require too much recall and invite ultra-negative feedback. Prioritize to 4 main questions, unless your goal is specifically to weed out unwanted users. 
  • Overconfidence in your product. Sounds like, "What's there to change? It's fine. Those complainers aren't our target market."
  • Uncertainty avoidance. Looks like analyzing in mid-test, rushing feedback, or accepting a wrong conclusion over not knowing.
  • Shiny Objects. As a rule, designers and other primates tend to covet shiny objects like the coolest interaction and the spiffiest layout. Designing to impress other designers is satisfying--until it bombs with your real users.

***

I didn't see any community posts up about the acquisition news today and thought it might be nice to have a space where news and reactions could be gathered that would be of interest to this group.

 

News and Reactions

  1. Letter from Dan
    "Working with Thoma Bravo over the past weeks, it is apparent that they support our strategy for focus on continued investment in Canvas LMS, expanding our impact in education, positioning Bridge to be more successful, and being a well-run business. As a private company, we will be able to better control our future and execute on these strategic imperatives."
  2. Instructure Enters Into a Definitive Agreement to be Acquired by Thoma Bravo (Instructure Press Release)
    "The Instructure management team, led by CEO Dan Goldsmith, will continue to lead the Company in their current roles. Thoma Bravo will support Instructure as it increases investment in education technology innovation and expands internationally."
  3. Private Equity Firm Thoma Bravo to Acquire Instructure for $2 Billion (Phil Hill)
    "Obviously this is big news for the LMS market, and it is worth noting that in the press release Thoma Bravo specifically mentions Canvas but not Bridge, which should give a hint about future plans. And perhaps more importantly, the press release explicitly mentions future growth that will or could include M&A – Instructure buying other companies."
  4. New Ownership for an LMS Giant: Private Equity Firm to Buy Instructure for $2 Billion (EdSurge)
    "But whether the sale is good news for colleges and other education customers remains to be seen, Hill added. “It’s now a waiting game to see how their strategy changes,” he said. 'Don’t expect it to be the same.'"
  5. Canvas parent Instructure to go private in $2B deal (EducationDive)
    "How private equity will influence Instructure's operations largely remains to be seen. And as part of the deal, the company has 35 days to entertain other offers.'"
  6. Instructure—Creator of Canvas LMS—Acquired by Private Equity Firm for $2 Billion in Cash (EdWeek Market Brief)
    "Brian Jaffee, a principal at Thoma Bravo said, 'We’ve followed the impressive Instructure growth story for many years and believe Canvas is a highly unique vertical market SaaS leader with exciting scale and future growth potential.'"
  7. Seven Things We Mostly Know About the Planned Instructure Acquisition and Three We Don’t (Phil Hill)
    "What does this mean for Instructure’s future? One guess is to expect the Bridge separation with increased focus on the Canvas / academic business to happen quickly. Another guess is to expect Instructure to ramp up their corporate acquisitions starting in 2020."

 

Background Information

  1. Thomas Bravo Website
    "We are a leading private equity investment firm building on a 40-year history of providing capital and strategic support to experienced management teams and growing technology companies."
  2. Instructure Considering Sale Options (Phil Hill)
    "For academic community, it is worth noting that much of the investor-based pressure is for Instructure to focus more on supporting Canvas, not less. Instructure management has made it a point to say that they are increasing investment in Canvas, but today’s news puts even more emphasis on that need."
  3. Why Instructure’s News Matters: Market history (Phil Hill)
    "Why is a potential change as mundane as having Instructure’s shares traded in public markets vs. being owned by a larger company newsworthy?"
  4. Canvas LMS Provider Instructure Considers Sale (EdSurge)
    "The last time a publicly traded learning management system provider was taken private was Blackboard, back in 2011."

 

Reactions on Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

I'm sure more news and reactions will be coming in and as I'll update this as they do - feel free add any links or questions in the comments, follow to stay up to date. It will be very interesting to understand what this means for the future of Canvas!

 

Photo by Oleg Magni from Pexels

Just before I get into the SpeedGrader, there has been some changes to the New Quizzes feature on November 16. You can still add/edit/remove any rubrics, but you cannot modify the instructions once the Quizzes 2 LTI is added.

 

New Quizzes Assignments 1

New Quizzes Assignments 2

 

Now to the main story. In my previous blog post (Hidden Gems: Working with Rubrics in New Quizzes), we've discussed how rubrics can be added to New Quizzes. This time, we'll talk about using SpeedGrader for New Quizzes.

 

Unlike regular assignments, where you go in and click on the SpeedGrader button on the right, New Quizzes does not display the button to you directly. You will need to go to the New Gradebook to do it.

 

FROM THE NEW GRADEBOOK

To go to the SpeedGrader from the New Gradebook, click the icon next to the grade (expand-start, the one with a right arrow inside a rectangle), then click the SpeedGrader.

Warning

If you turn on Launch SpeedGrader Filtered by Student Group in Settings, you must select a student group before launching SpeedGrader. This is to make sure there are no grading issues for large courses.

 

 

USING A URL

To launch the SpeedGrader for any assignment (including New Quizzes), visit your Canvas URL for your local institution. After the URL, type /courses/XXXXXXX/gradebook/speed_grader?assignment_id=YYYYYYYY where XXXXXXX is the 7-digit course ID and YYYYYYYY is the 8-digit assignment ID. For example, if the course ID is 1234567 and the assignment ID is 12345678, you would enter /courses/1234567/gradebook/speed_grader?assignment_id=12345678 after the URL.

Note: If the numbers contain leading zeros, you do not need to enter them.

 

There we go! 

 

Uh-oh! Some of our students failed to submit! That raises eyebrows for us! We click on the View Rubric to see the rubric that we've created from the previous post. 

 

SpeedGrader in New Quizzes

 

This is the rubric that we've created from the previous post.

 

SpeedGrader in New Quizzes

 

Since the student did not take the quiz at all, we would click No. A Yes is denoted by a green arrow, while a No is denoted by a red arrow. Finally, save the rubric selections.

 

Yes or No?

 

We would mark the completion status as Incomplete in this case. You can also leave a comment to encourage the student to catch up.

(Please be polite when writing comments in the SpeedGrader. You don't want students to get upset!)

 

Rubric Incomplete

 

In Part 2, we'll show you how to grade questions and check for errors in SpeedGrader for New Quizzes.

Some people are wondering: Is there a way to add a rubric to a New Quiz? The answer is actually yes, but it is in a hidden location. Here's how you can do it.

 

  1. Perform the same steps as you usually would when creating a new assignment. Do not use the +Quiz/Test button.
  2. Fill in some quiz information, such as the title and instructions from the Assignments page.
    Assignment 1
  3. Do not select any External Tools just yet, because we're going to add a rubric next. Just save the quiz for now. That's because once the Quizzes 2 External Tool is added, no further changes to the quiz instructions and rubrics can be made.
  4. Now that the assignment is created, we're going to click the +Rubric button below.
    Add Rubric
  5. Perform the same steps as you usually would when adding a new rubric to an assignment. However, there are some differences to keep in mind:
    Adding New Rubric
    1. Rubrics cannot be used effectively for grading in quizzes since quiz scores are calculated based on the number of points assigned to each quiz question. Therefore, do not use this rubric for assignment grading. However, you can add a rubric to a practice quiz (Restrict Student Result View > Show Points: ON) or ungraded survey (Restrict Student Result View > Show Points: OFF and hide all correct/incorrect indicators). Do not count this assignment towards the final grade must also be turned on.
    2. To avoid any point conflicts with assessment grades, select Remove points from rubric. This is recommended since we favor high scores over rubrics with mediocre feedback.
  6. Click Edit to go back to editing the assignment, and then set up the Quizzes 2 External Tool. If you're satisfied with your rubric and instructions, go ahead and click Save. By clicking Save, the quiz instructions from the Assignments page and the rubric(s) associated with this New Quiz can no longer be edited.

 

Advanced Options

The availability of the following options varies by your local institution.

 

MODERATED GRADING
Allow moderators to review multiple independent grades for selected submissions.

 

ANONYMOUS GRADING
Graders cannot view student names. This can be changed by selecting Hide student names in the SpeedGrader. Grades will not be released automatically, and unmuting or posting grades will automatically disable Anonymous Grading.

 

ANONYMOUS INSTRUCTOR ANNOTATIONS 
Anonymize all annotations made by instructors on submissions for this assignment in DocViewer.

 

Next time, we'll show you how rubrics work in SpeedGrader for New Quizzes assignments.

At FIU Online (based in Miami, Florida International University) we are blessed to be able to participate in a variety of professional development opportunities, such as leading conference presentations or attending at conferences. For the past two years, Maikel Alendy (FIU Online's newly appointed Learning Design Innovation Manager) presented with FIU Earth & Environmental Dept. Professor Rodolfo Rego at Realities 360. The annual conference addresses the latest developments in the use of virtual reality (VR) for training and education. Beyond being a great presenter, I'm always learning new things from Maikel; he raises "my bar."

 

 In their 2019 presentation, "Lessons from a Year of Cost-Effective Immersive Strategies in Higher Ed" they covered the two prominent college classroom challenges: technology costs and instructional relevance. Specifically, they addressed how to create VR assignments using tools like Cenario VR, Seekbeak and GoogleEarth. An example of a solution they demonstrated was a interactive laboratory orientation. Often when students would arrive in labs, they were unsure where materials were located and "wasted" valuable lab time. Additionally another example shared was a tour of FIU's Nature Preserve (link is website, not the example) with great interactions to explore and learn more about its features.

 

  

If an image is worth a 1000 words, what is a 360 image worth?

 

[Unfortunately the embed for SeekBeek is not working here once I publish the article, but it works in Canvas & also WordPress. See an example in one of our articles on our Faculty news source.]

*Blog article written with assistance from Charles Roig (FIU Online)

 

Keep Learning,


Sky V. King
Senior Instructional Designer, FIU Online
Adjunct- Marketing & Logistics, FIU

I don't know about you, but I love podcasts. I would never do my own, so I especially laud and respect those that do. Know what else I love? Canvas & the Canvas Community.  Now those two loves have mashed up like PB & J, introducing the CanvasCasters podcast. Friendly Disclaimer: This is an unofficial Canvas LMS podcast.

 

Your hosts with the most-est are Eddie Small and Marcus Painter. They tout themselves as two middle-aged men seeking to become Canvas Jedi! [ Wonder if they know the #CanvasJediSloth ??? ] Learn about their secret identities. Their goal is to publish a new PANDAcast (podcast) every few weeks.

 

Beyond learning about their Harry Potter themed Professional Development Speed Dating endeavor, learn more about takeaways from CanvasCon 2019 & CanInnovate 2019. What's really awesome about the podcasts is their special guests! So far, they have had the following amazing guests. 

 

Episode NumberPanda-tastic
Special Guests
Megan Tolin
2Paul Towers
3Kona Jones 
...more Kona Jones to love! (actually Episode 3 Part 2)
5Chris giles
6Eddie Small & Marcus Painter (your hosts; thanks for the special shout-out re: this blog post)
7Kyle Beimfohr
8Scott Dennis & Renee Carney

 

You can find CanvasCasters in a variety of ways:

 

Maybe they will even do a live podcast during instructurecon 2020 in beautiful Nashville, TN?

Check it out and let me know what you think? Also, share some of your best podcasts that you love (as much as the Canvas Community)! And remember, canvasworksforus.

 

Keep Learning,

Sky V.
Senior Instructional Designer, FIU Online
Adjunct in Marketing & Logistics, FIU

Most of us would probably agree, students don't "need" a tutorial on using Canvas. Students are following the lead of their instructor in terms of course design. However, it may not hurt to provide options for our students, especially when it comes to learning a new LMS.

That's why we've created a new Canvas student tutorial course, called Building with Canvas. Just like faculty have a training course in Growing with Canvas, this one is intended  for students.

 

Building with Canvas course card

What Is The Course?

This self-paced course is designed to help students learn how to use Canvas effectively in face-to-face classrooms AND within online learning environments. No prior Canvas experience is required. Students will earn four badges (using Badgr) to demonstrate their accomplishments. Badges are earned at the end of each Module.
course badge animated gif

 

How Can I Use It?

The course is published to the Canvas Commons to use and adopt at your institution! 
Building with Canvas - link to the course in the Canvas Commons (or just search for it in the Commons). If you need help using the Canvas Commons, check out this Canvas help guide - How do I use Commons? Alternatively, you can download the course file directly and import that into a new sandbox course in your Canvas instance.

 

The course is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License -- that means you are welcome to share it and edit it to meed the needs of your institution.

 

For Canvas Admins

This course includes a Canvas admin setup guide for you to easily deploy it at your institution. Take a look at the first Page inside the Introduction Module for information about setting up the badges for the course and how to deploy it to your students. 

 

Our design team at Lord Fairfax Community College have spent many hours designing every aspect of this course and we really hope it will help with student adoption and improve familiarity with Canvas. 

 

Please "Like" and share this resource if you find it useful!

 

Comments welcome below!

 

I did this some time ago when running a workshop for academics and course designers. It may help people understand how to design a #Mastery Paths module. I set up each phase as a Canvas Module.  The orange items are generally a page or quiz. If useful I can upload some others I have done. The grey boxes are where Mastery Paths can be used to make simple decisions.

Mastery 1

On March 15, Ventura College hosted the 4th Annual district-wide Distance Education Summit. The theme was, “Reaching Every Student: Accessibility and Equity in Online Learning”. The day included sessions, workshops, and a student panel addressing issues of access and equity in hybrid and online classes.

Keynote speaker, Gaeir Dietrich, gave a rousing talk on Universal Design for Student Success, exploring the key principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), learning and teaching styles, and the intersection of accessibility and basic skills. Dietrich is a consultant and trainer on access and Section 508 compliance.

Faculty and staff from Ventura and Moorpark Colleges presented on a variety of topics, including: Online Student Services, Humanizing Your Course for Equitable Outcomes, and the new districtwide software program, Ally, which will improve the usability and accessibility of online course content. Ventura College presenters included Asher Sund , Eric Martinsen , Tania DeClerck , Araceli Trujillo  , Sharon Oxford , Margaret Phelps, and John Ruff. Presenters from Moorpark College included: Suzanne Fagan, Jolie Herzig, Jennifer Lawler, Richard Feilden, Deanna Ochoa, and Kara Lybarger-Monson.

Keynote and Ventura College Instructional Technologist

Sharon Oxford Ali Olson-Pacheco (key contributors)

Our campus piloted Canvas for 2 semesters and due to a number of reasons we decided "Not" to adopt the platform. We had about 40 classes and the instructors using Canvas now wanted to retrieve their materials and assessments from Canvas and put them back into the campus LMS, Moodle. Just as a side note Canvas was actually built out on an earlier version of the open source code from Moodle. This is where the dilemma begins. Apparently, no one else has decided to walk away...as we did. There is no way to easily remove your materials or your student work from Canvas once it goes in. Institutions need to maintain students records and the artifacts associated with their grades. This is a giant mess and I feel compelled to let the rest of the community know exactly what you are getting into. I think that this is the new model for LMS companies as I believe Bb also is making extraction of content and data out of their system difficult as well. So, be forewarned and check your options before taking that leap of faith! 

UNLV's Office of Online Education is looking for an Instructional Art Manager! Please share or apply using the link below if interested. 

 

https://www.higheredjobs.com/institution/details.cfm?JobCode=176882119&Title=%2AREVISED%2A%20Instructional%20Art%20Manag… 

 

ROLE of the POSITION

The Instructional Art (IA) Manager works to develop a campus culture that embraces digital teaching and learning by supporting instructional artists as they engage faculty in online and hybrid course development and revision. The IA Manager uses a growth mindset (Dweck, 2007) to help the instructional art team function as members of a supportive OE team. The IA Manager has strong pedagogical knowledge, art expertise, online education experience and collaborative supervisory skills that promote best practices in instructional art. The Manager supports instructional artists and faculty through the course design and development stages; evaluates OE courses for consistency with art standards and best practices; identifies and organizes resources for skill and knowledge development for OE instructional artists; and brings research-based perspectives to the art and science of instructional art. The IA Manager collaborates with the instructional design and instructional applications programming staff. The IA Manager also supports OE by working on issues, programs or projects at the request of the Director.

*QUALIFICATIONS*

Minimum Qualifications:

  • Masters degree in Instructional Media Design, Digital Arts, Educational Technology, or related field
  • 2 years supervisory experience
  • 3-5+ years direct experience in the following areas:
    • Conceptualizing and transforming textual materials to visual elements o Using appropriate educational technology to enhance teaching and learning in online courses
    • Building courses in a learning management system in a higher education setting
    • Supporting and developing a cooperative team of professionals.
    • Teaching or training in a higher education setting
  • Formal knowledge in instructional media design and learning theories, approaches, and practices, including the ability to remain current within the discipline.
  • Ability to assess and support or shift (as needed) organizational culture 
  • Growth mindset with demonstrated ability to be resilient and agile (Broza, 2015). 
  • Instructional art skills that effectively use various technologies and practices in the online experience.
  • Ability to analyze feedback from summative evaluation of OE classes and develop strategies for instructional artists to use as they encourage faculty to improve student outcomes. 
  • Ability to support communities of practice in digital teaching and learning.
  • Adept at providing support for multiple courses in a variety of disciplines.

Preferred Qualifications:

  • 5+ years experience working in higher education
  • Higher education staff supervisory experience
  • Expertise in Canvas 

Best of luck, 

Hannah

It is now possible to connect Hypothesis, a free and open source collaborative annotation tool, with your Canvas course.  You could use this for activities in which your students collaboratively comment or annotate web sites, documents, and other items.  See this tutorial for how Hypothesis works, and here are some quick start guides for teachers and students.

Installing and Using Hypothesis in Canvas

See these instructions for installing the Hypothesis app in your Canvas course.

And then see how to use the Hypothesis app in Canvas Modules or use Hypothesis as part of a Canvas Assignment.

This saves you and your students time by allowing for single sign-on use of Hypothesis:

The Hypothesis LMS app automatically provisions accounts for all students enrolled in any course using the app. This means that students can navigate to a Hypothesis-enabled reading and begin annotating without ever creating or logging into a separate account. Even better, the entire course roster of students and teachers will all be joined and annotate by default in an automatically-created private Hypothesis group that matches the course in the LMS.

Gradebook integration is a feature planned for the future.

Using Hypothesis in Your Course: Pedagogical Techniques

More Videos: Using Hypothesis in Canvas

Here are some video tutorials recently posted by Hypothesis:

  1. Creating an Hypothesis PDF module item in Canvas - YouTube 
  2. Creating an Hypothesis URL module item in Canvas - YouTube 
  3. Single Signon with Hypothesis in Canvas - YouTube  

 

(This was originally posted to the Valencia College Circles of Innovation blog.)

Have you ever wished there was a resource you could reference when setting up a Canvas course? Well, good news...now there is one! The Training Services department shared all of their collective experiences working in education and training clients for years to build this collaborative resource that instructors will hopefully find useful referencing when creating their courses in Canvas.         

 

Potential Uses of the Checklists

  • Review the Beginning-of-Course checklist to ensure your course is ready to publish for students

  • Reference the End-of-Course checklist to help wrap up your course before the term concludes

  • Share with your colleagues so they can also benefit from the checklists

 

Screenshot image of first checklist page

  

Access

The checklist resource is available via Google Docs "Make a Copy" so you can customize for your institution. Please select the following link for access: Beginning- and End-of-Course Checklists Editable Copy

 

Feel free to leave us comments about this resource or share the practices you use at the beginning and end of a course in Canvas.

 

The Training Services Department at Instructure is committed to supporting any training needs at your Institution. Reach out to your CSM if you are interested in learning more about this resource, additional resources or any of our training offerings.

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