Laura Gibbs

Twitter Moment in Canvas: Feedback Resources

Blog Post created by Laura Gibbs on Jul 11, 2018

I was excited to see a new #InstCon Twitter Moment pop up at Twitter today (yay Tracey DeLillo!); here it is: InstCon Suspense. As part of my Feedback project, I also have a Twitter Feedback Moment that I created and will be using to share feedback-related tweets with my students: Feedback Resources Twitter Moment.

 

Basically, a Moment is a way to save a group of related tweets and share them easily with others. The name doesn't really make that clear; the tweets don't have to be close to each other in time at all! I use Twitter Moments to collect and share tweets in specific content-based streams for my classes, and it is a really useful tool since it is integrated into the natural flow of things at Twitter; you can add a given tweet to a Moment in a single click, automatically sending new content to any webspace where you have embedded the Moment. 

 

So, if you are interested in experimenting with Moments yourself, here are four key things I've learned that help me make good use of Twitter Moments:

 

1. Learn how to share your Moment. You can embed Moments in a website, a blog, or in a Canvas page. Being able to share the content in multiple spaces multiplies the value of that content! Here's my Feedback Moment in a Canvas Page: it's like inviting Brene Brown to be part of my class -- how cool is that?! Adding a Moment to Canvas is like adding any other Twitter widget, and I have detailed instructions here: Twitter4Canvas.

 

screenshot of twitter moment in canvas

 

2. Learn how to edit your Moment. Since the content of the Moment is changing, it's good to make it a daily routine to edit your Moment. That's how it works for me anyway; I add at least one or two things to the Feedback Moment each day, and by default they appear at the bottom, so I edit the Moment each morning to pop the new things up to the top (you can order it by newest on top or oldest on top), and maybe also to change the cover art.

 

editing moment screenshot

 

3. Be aware of media in Moments. One of my biggest frustrations with the Moments widget is that it only displays pictures that are actually in the tweet; it does not grab preview images from news outlets as the normal Twitter view does. So, if you are keen on images in tweets (I am!), then you need to be aware that image handling is, unfortunately, not the same in a Moment. Here's a comparison of a tweet in the regular Twitter view and how it is rendered in a Moment:

IN TWITTER:

screenshot of media in twitter

IN MOMENT:

screenshot of media in Twitter: moment

 

4. Harvest from Moments. I think Moments are great for sharing via widgets, but they are not good for long-term curation. So, at least for me, the best strategy is to use a more powerful, flexible curation tool like Diigo or Pinterest to save contents that I discover; Moments are a good way to remind myself to bookmark stuff in Diigo or Pinterest as appropriate. Then, as I curate elsewhere, I often delete that item from the Moment, which has the added advantage of keeping the Moment focused and fresh also.

 

 Are there any other Twitter-Moment fans out there? What tips do you have?

 

And yes, this is part of my Feedback Project for the coming school year; here are more of my feedback posts.

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