Laura Gibbs

Feedback: Ready, Set, GO for Fall!

Blog Post created by Laura Gibbs on Jul 17, 2018

Okay, as of today, I think I have the feedback flow in my class squared away in terms of the student assignments. There's lots more I could do... but I've made enough changes for Fall that it will count as a good experiment, and then I can tinker some more in the Spring. This year is going to be a hard one, I know that in advance (family stuff), so I'm really glad to have made these changes and to have them nicely in place. Here's what I've done:

 

Feedback resource site. I cleaned up and annotated the feedback articles that I had bookmarked in Diigo and created a resource site for my students that I hope can be useful to others too. It's inside my old Growth Mindset Canvas course space:

Feedback Articles: Exploring Growth Mindset 

I've also documented the simple step-by-step for adding new articles to that site. I was so excited that Cathy Davidson noticed this at Twitter, and she is sharing it around at HASTAC. The power of open sharing!!!

How Do You Give Feedback in Engaged, Activist Learning? | HASTAC 

 

HASTAC screenshot

 

Revised assignments. Based on those resources, I redesigned by first two feedback exploration assignments. I think they are going to be even better now that there is a real library of articles for students to browse if they want:

Week 2: Receiving and Using Feedback

Week 3: Giving Feedback to Others

 

Expanded techniques. In the past I had students practice a set of strategies that I called WWW, and I was really pleased to find out that my own WWW is a lot like the TAG approach that is popular among writing teachers, esp. in K-12. So, I now have two weeks of practice, WWW and also TAG so that students can see it's possible to create different approaches/mnemonics for feedback, based on what works best for them:

Week 4: Practicing WWW: Wow, Wonder, What-If

Week 5: Practicing TAG: Tell, Ask, Give

Oh, note to self: one thing I need to do is to update the Growth Mindset Challenges to include more feedback challenges, and encouraging students to come up with a mnemonic of their own for feedback strategies could be really cool!

 

Feedback Gallery. I wrote a separate post about the Feedback Gallery; along with WWW and TAG, this is the most important resource I have to help students learn to do a good job with feedback.

Feedback Gallery: By-Students For-Students 

... see the Gallery in Canvas

 

Feedback Padlet. I'm using a Padlet to keep track of feedback graphics which I can reuse in the class announcements, and which the students can also browse for ideas and information. I wrote about that here:

Feedback Resources Padlet in Canvas 

... see the Padlet in Canvas

 

Week by week feedback. During Weeks 6-14, students are giving each other feedback on their projects. I used to have separate pages for all those weeks, but I've realized that I can actually re-use the same randomizing javascript all semester and just tweak it from week to week (I'll write about that some other time). So, instead of 9 webpages, I've got just one now which I can focus on making really clear, adjusting as needed week to week.

Weekly Project Feedback (Weeks 6-14)

 

Final feedback. As their final feedback assignment of the semester, I'll be asking students to help me add more examples to the Feedback Gallery!

Week 15: Add to Gallery

 

Fun new widget. I created a fun new widget that draws on my Feedback Cats plus my new Feedback Padlet so that there is a new random feedback resource or graphic that shows up at the bottom of those feedback pages. I just learned that all items in a Padlet have a very nice linkable address, so that's what allowed me to make a widget based on content in a Padlet. So, the graphics that come from the Padlet link to the Padlet; the graphics from the Mindset blog link to the blog; each graphic has a "find out more" link below. I've added the widget to my Canvas Widget Warehouse! 

Widget: Feedback Resources

(There's a link there to the source table also so that you could just take the table, add/delete as needed, and create your own javascript at RotateContent.com.)

 

screenshot new widget

 

I was feeling a little bad that there were other ideas and experiments I wanted to explore, but looking at this list, I feel really good about it. I need to move on to other things in order to be done getting my classes set up this week, and I am very excited to see what the students will do with these new resources and strategies.

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