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rake_9
Community Champion

Request Process for Increasing File Quota

A while ago, I asked about the technical impact of increasing the instructor file quota for a course (Impact of changing storage quota for a course ).  Now, I'm curious about how Admins manage requests to increase the quota.

Do you just take these requests ad hoc or do you have a request process of some sort?  Do you have a set of criteria for judging when a quota increase is a good idea compared to when it is better to guide people to other solutions?  How do you handle courses that will need a quota increase each semester?

Thanks.

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4 Replies
kona
Community Coach
Community Coach

We review requests as they come, but we've been using Canvas since 2012-2013 and the only time we've gotten requests is for video rich courses. In those cases we've directed faculty to host their video either on YouTube (as private if they don't want others to see it) or on our College's video hosting site (we use Wistia).

rake_9
Community Champion

Thanks Kona.  The folks who use media have been fairly easy to redirect.  Our struggle is folks who provide a lot of resource files for their students.  Some certainly should be better optimized, but some are just large or amazingly numerous....

kona
Community Coach
Community Coach

Ah, for those folks we've directed them to Google Drive, which is an even better option now that it integrates with Canvas!

Our faculty can now integrate (using the LTI Google Drive integration) their Google account with Canvas. This allows them to add their files from their Google Drive into Canvas quickly and easily!

rake_9
Community Champion

Ah.  We are not a Google school, and are not (yet) in a position to integrate Office 365.  We do have institutional access to Box and have set up that integration.  We are encouraging document-heavy courses to go that route, but that doesn't always work.  Sometimes this is because of limits to the integration, sometimes from instructional staff who don't want to take the extra steps.