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kmeeusen
Community Coach
Community Coach

CanvasHacks Classroom

Jump to solution

8/15/2018 Update:  To sign up as a student, use this link:

This course has enabled open enrollment. Students can self-enroll in the course once you share with them this URL:https://resources.instructure.com/enroll/8R9H7B. Alternatively, they can sign up at https://resources.instructure.com/register and use the following join code: 8R9H7B

 @chofer ,  @G_Petruzella  stefaniesanders, awebster

Hi folks, it looks like Scott the Magnificent has already created us a CanvasHacks public classroom to play in, and enrolled us as teachers.

Any thoughts on structure? I have a similar course that is mostly complete that I am preparing for my faculty that I could upload to provide a bit of structure. It is intended for non-coders, and has the following module structure:

  • About HTML and the HTML Editor - DO NOT FEAR THE CODE!
  • Beginning Users
  • Intermediate users
  • Advanced users
  • Sharing (sharing has a discussion and links to external resoursces

However, I am not a pushy sort, so whatever anybody else wants, I am more than happy to go along with. I can always upload stuff a piece at a time and fit it where I can.

My "lessons" are all one page, and include:

  • A brief description
  • The code snippet
  • Anatomy of the code snippet where I identify those components that are easy to modify by novices like myself
  • Instructions for use
  • Troubleshooting, and
  • Sometimes some obvious variations based on changes to parts of the code (colors, sizes, positions etc. - the minor stuff)

Let me know what your think!

Oh yah, and I also have a hokey Home page, because that's just the kind of guy I am:)

1,004 Replies
zdela
Community Member

I would like to join as a student.  Thank you!

zdela@icloud.com

kmeeusen
Community Coach
Community Coach

Welcome aboard, Dan!

You should receive your invite shortly.

Enjoy!

anederveld
Community Member

Hi, I would love to join as a student! Thanks!

-Allison

anederveld@rhsmith.umd.edu

Welcome aboard, Allison!

You should receive your invite shortly.

Enjoy!

bschneider
Community Participant

Thanks all for putting these materials together.
Requesting an invitte for bschneider@eagles.ewu.edu

Cheers

Welcome aboard Brent!

You should receive your invite shortly.

Enjoy!

jdubas
Community Participant

I'd like an invite!

Thanks, Scott!

129713
Community Member

This area has been wonderful.  There were things I wanted to do with my class that I just couldn't figure until I found the resources here, so THNAK YOU!

I wanted to share the HTML for my first Canvas-Hack-based page.

It is a series of practice problems that allow students to click on answers to see if they are correct and see solutions.

I hope people find it useful and can adapt to their needs.

Thanks again and best regards,

John Byrd

CU Denver (john.byrd@ucdenver.edu)

Here is the HTML code.

I teach MBA finance so it is a numbers oriented page but the template can probably be adapted for lots of uses.

________________

<blockquote>

<h3>Security Valuation Practice Problems</h3>

Click on an answer to check it. <br /><br /> 1. A bond has a 6% coupon rate, matures in exactly 8 years, pays interest semi-annually and has a face value of $1,000. If current market conditions have bonds of similar risk and maturity priced to return 5%, what will this bond sell for? Hint: Is the 6% coupon a premium over current rates?

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link1A" href="#dialog_for_link1A"> A. $1,000.00</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link1A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This result requires the coupon rate to equal the current market rate.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link1B" href="#dialog_for_link1B"> B. $1,064.63</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link1B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This answer doesn't include semi-annual compounding. For example, the Excel formula might have been =PV(5%,8,60,1000,0). But it needs to adjust the RATE and the NPER inputs for semi-annual compounding.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link1C" href="#dialog_for_link1C"> C. $1,065.28</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link1C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong> The Excel formula is: =PV(2.5%,16,30,1000,0)</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

2. A bond has a 6% coupon rate, matures in exactly 8 years, pays interest semi-annually and has a face value of $1,000. If current market conditions have bonds of similar risk and maturity priced to return 6%, what will this bond sell for? Hint: Is the 6% coupon a premium over current rates?

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link2A" href="#dialog_for_link2A"> A. $1,000.00</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link2A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong><br /> Since the coupon rate equals the current market rate or bond will sell at par or at its face value of $1,000.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link2B" href="#dialog_for_link2B"> B. $1,064.63</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link2B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This answer requires discounting at a rate lower than the market rate of 6%.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link2C" href="#dialog_for_link2C"> C. $1,105.28</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link2C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This answer requires discounting at a rate lower than the market rate of 6%.</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

3. A bond has a 6% coupon rate, matures in exactly 8 years, pays interest semi-annually and has a face value of $1,000. If its current market price is $939.53, what is this bond's yield-to-maturity? Hint: Is the yield higher or lower than the 6% coupon rate?

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link3A" href="#dialog_for_link3A"> A. 5.5%</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link3A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> Since the bond is selling at a discount the YTM must be greater than the coupon rate of 6%.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link3B" href="#dialog_for_link3B"> B. 6.4%</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link3B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> Discounting the bond's features at this rate results in a price of $975.26 = PV(3.2%,16,30,1000,0). The correct YTM will discount the bond to the $939.53 price.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link3C" href="#dialog_for_link3C"> C. 7.0%</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link3C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong> The Excel formula is:   =RATE(16,30,-939.53,1000,0,4%) = 3.5%</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog">Since this is a semi-annual rate w double it to get a 7.0% annual rate.</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog">We can check our answer:=PV(3.5%,16,30,1000,0)=$939.53</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

4. A bond has a 7% coupon rate, matures in exactly 8 years, pays interest semi-annually and has a face value of $1,000. Current market conditions for bonds of similar risk and maturity price these bonds to return 6%, so this bond sells for $1,062.81.  If interest rates suddenly drop to 5% what will happen to the bond's price? <br />

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link4A" href="#dialog_for_link4A"> A. Decreases to $1,000<br /></a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link4A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This result requires the coupon rate to equal the current market rate.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link4B" href="#dialog_for_link4B"> B. Increases to $1,129.26<br /></a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link4B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This answer doesn't include semi-annual compounding. For example, the Excel formula might have been =PV(5%,8,70,1000,0). But it needs to have the RATE, PMT and the NPER inputs adjusted for semi-annual compounding.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link4C" href="#dialog_for_link4C"> C. Increases to $1,130.55</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link4C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong> The Excel formula is: =PV(2.5%,16,30,1000,0)=$1,130.55</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

5. An investor purchased a bond for $1,000 at issuance.  The bond has a 6% coupon rate, matures in exactly 15 years, pays interest semi-annually and has a face value of $1,000. If the investor must sell the bond today, and current market conditions have bonds of similar risk and maturity priced to return 5%, what price will he sell the bond for?

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link5A" href="#dialog_for_link5A"> A. $1,000.00</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link5A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This result requires the coupon rate to equal the current market rate.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link5B" href="#dialog_for_link5B"> B. $1,064.63</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link5B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This answer doesn't include semi-annual compounding. For example, the Excel formula might have been =PV(5%,8,60,1000,0). But it needs to adjust the RATE and the NPER inputs for semi-annual compounding.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link5C" href="#dialog_for_link5C"> C. $1,065.28</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link5C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong> The Excel formula is: =PV(2.5%,16,30,1000,0)</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

6. A bond has a 7% coupon rate, matures in exactly 17 years, pays interest semi-annually and has a face value of $1,000.  Current market rates for bonds of this risk profile are 5%, so the bond should sell for $1,227.24 (You can check this).  However, the bond is callable in exactly 3 years.  Since the coupon rate of 7% is far above the current market rate of 5%, investors are pricing the bond as if it will be called.  What price are investors paying for the bond if they will receive a call premium of $1,140 instead of the $1,000 face value and the bond is called in exactly 3 years? <br />

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link6A" href="#dialog_for_link6A"> A. $980.00</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link1A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> The bond has to be selling for more than $1,000 since the coupon rate is far above the current market rate..</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link6B" href="#dialog_for_link6B"> B. $1,175.80</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link6B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong><br /> The Excel formula is =PV(2.5%,6,35,1140,0). This reflects</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog">

<ul>

<li>2.5%: the semi-annual equivalent of the 5% current market rate.</li>

<li>6: The semi-annual periods for 3 years until the bond is called.</li>

<li>35: the semi-annual coupon payments or interest payments.</li>

<li>1140: The amount that investors will receive if the bond is called, a $140 call premium over the $1,000 face value.</li>

</ul>

</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link6C" href="#dialog_for_link6C"> C. $1,227.24</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link6C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong> This is the value of the bond ignoring its callability. The Excel formula is: =PV(2.5%,34,35,1000,0)</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog">Notice that the face value is the $1,000 standard face value without the call premium.</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

7. A bond has a 6% coupon rate, matures in exactly 8 years, pays interest semi-annually and has a face value of $1,000. If current market conditions have bonds of similar risk and maturity priced to return 7%, what will this bond sell for? Hint: Is the 6% coupon a premium over current rates?

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link7A" href="#dialog_for_link7A"> A. $939.53</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link7A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong><br /> The Excel formula is =PV(3.5%,16,30,1000,0)</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link7B" href="#dialog_for_link7B"> B. $1,000.00</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link7B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This answer ddoesn't adjust for the market rate of 7%.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link7C" href="#dialog_for_link7C"> C. $1,065.28</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link7C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong> The Excel formula is: =PV(3.5%,16,30,1000,0)</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog">The Rate inlut should be half of 7%.</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

8. A bond has a 6% coupon rate, matures in exactly 20 years, pays interest semi-annually and has a face value of $1,000. If I  buy the bond for $1,000 today and it is called in 2 years with a $120 call premium, what is my rate of return?  Hint: Use the Excel RATE function, but think about whether this is an annual or semi-annual rate. To check your answer the discounted futre cash flows should equal the purchase price of $1,000.  If you have done the problem correctly, the Rate result is a semi-annual rate.  To turn it into the exact annual rate we need to compute (1+Rate)<sup>2</sup> - 1 , so a semi-annual rate of 5% becomes an annual rate of (1.05)<sup>2</sup> - 1 = 0.1025 = 10.25%  a little higher than the doubled rate.<br />

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link8A" href="#dialog_for_link8A"> A. 5.75%</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link8A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This is the semi-annual rate.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link8B" href="#dialog_for_link8B"> B. 6%</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link8B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This result requires the payment on the called bond to be $1,000 but there is a call premium so the rate should be higher than the coupon rate.</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link8C" href="#dialog_for_link8C"> C. 11.837%</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link8C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong> The Excel formula is: =RATE(4,30,-1000,1120,0,) =0.057 which is th semi-annual rate.</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog">Turning this into the annual rate (1.0575)<sup>2</sup> - 1 (or =1.0575^2 - 1 in Excel) = 011837319 = 11.837%</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

9. A share of preferred stock pays a $2.50 annual dividend.  If the stock is priced to return 10% what is its price today? <br />

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link9A" href="#dialog_for_link9A"> A. $15.00</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link9A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> Preferred stock is a perpetuity so is valued as</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link9B" href="#dialog_for_link9B"> B. $25.00</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link9B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong><br /> Preferred stock is a perpetuity so is valued as .</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link9C" href="#dialog_for_link9C"> C. $30.00</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link9C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> Preferred stock is a perpetuity so is valued as</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

10. General Products has just paid a $1.50 annual dividend.  Investor expect the dividend to grow 3% per year indefinitely.  If investors require a 12% return from securities of this risk, what is General Products' stock price today?

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link10A" href="#dialog_for_link10A"> A. $12.50</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link10A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This result doesn't grow the dividend one period as is required by the Gordon Constant Dividend Growth model.</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog"><img class="equation_image" title="P_0=\frac{Div\:x\:\left(1+g\right)}{\left(r\:-\:g\right)}\:\:\:" src="/equation_images/P_0%253D%255Cfrac%257BDiv%255C%253Ax%255C%253A%255Cleft%25281%2Bg%255Cright%2529%257D%257B%255Cleft%2528r%255C%253A-%255C%253Ag%255Cright%2529%257D%255C%253A%255C%253A%255C%253A" alt="P_0=\frac{Div\:x\:\left(1+g\right)}{\left(r\:-\:g\right)}\:\:\:" /></div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link10B" href="#dialog_for_link10B"> B. $12.875</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link10B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> This answer doesn't subtract the growth rate from the required rate of return in the denominator as required by the 

<div id="dialog_for_link10A" class="enhanceable_content dialog">Gordon Constant Dividend Growth model.</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog"><img class="equation_image" title="P_0=\frac{Div\:x\:\left(1+g\right)}{\left(r\:-\:g\right)}\:\:\:" src="/equation_images/P_0%253D%255Cfrac%257BDiv%255C%253Ax%255C%253A%255Cleft%25281%2Bg%255Cright%2529%257D%257B%255Cleft%2528r%255C%253A-%255C%253Ag%255Cright%2529%257D%255C%253A%255C%253A%255C%253A" alt="P_0=\frac{Div\:x\:\left(1+g\right)}{\left(r\:-\:g\right)}\:\:\:" /></div>

</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link10C" href="#dialog_for_link10C"> C. $17.17</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link10C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link10A" class="enhanceable_content dialog">Using the Gordon Constant Dividend Growth model.</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog"><img class="equation_image" title="P_0=\frac{Div\:x\:\left(1+g\right)}{\left(r\:-\:g\right)}\:\:\:=\frac{1.50x1.03}{0.12-0.03}=\frac{1.545}{0.09}=17.166667" src="/equation_images/P_0%253D%255Cfrac%257BDiv%255C%253Ax%255C%253A%255Cleft%25281%2Bg%255Cright%2529%257D%257B%255Cleft%2528r%255C%253A-%255C%253Ag%255Cright%2529%257D%255C%253A%255C%253A%255C%253A%253D%255Cfrac%257B1.50x1.03%257D%257B0.12-0.03%257D%253D%255Cfrac%257B1.545%257D%257B0.09%257D%253D17.166667" alt="P_0=\frac{Div\:x\:\left(1+g\right)}{\left(r\:-\:g\right)}\:\:\:=\frac{1.50x1.03}{0.12-0.03}=\frac{1.545}{0.09}=17.166667" /></div>

</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

11. ACME common stock sells for $28.60 per share.  Its most recent annual dividend was $2.20.  If investors demand a 12% required rate of return from the stock, what dividend growth rate are they assuming the company will have?

<blockquote>

<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link11A" href="#dialog_for_link11A"> A. 3%</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link11A" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong><br /> At a growth rate of 3%the price would be (2.20x1.035)/(.12-.035) =$26.79</div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link11B" href="#dialog_for_link11B"> B. 4%<br /></a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link11B" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Correct. </strong><br /> In the dividend growth model <img class="equation_image" title="P_0=\frac{Div\:x\:\left(1+g\right)}{\left(r\:-\:g\right)}\:\:\:so\:g=\frac{Pr\:-\:D}{P\:+\:D}" src="/equation_images/P_0%253D%255Cfrac%257BDiv%255C%253Ax%255C%253A%255Cleft%25281%2Bg%255Cright%2529%257D%257B%255Cleft%2528r%255C%253A-%255C%253Ag%255Cright%2529%257D%255C%253A%255C%253A%255C%253Aso%255C%253Ag%253D%255Cfrac%257BPr%255C%253A-%255C%253AD%257D%257BP%255C%253A%2B%255C%253AD%257D" alt="P_0=\frac{Div\:x\:\left(1+g\right)}{\left(r\:-\:g\right)}\:\:\:so\:g=\frac{Pr\:-\:D}{P\:+\:D}" />.</div>

<div class="enhanceable_content dialog">Inserting numbers we have <img class="equation_image" title="\frac{28.60\:x\:0.12\:-\:2.2}{28.6\:+\:2.20}=\:0.04" src="/equation_images/%255Cfrac%257B28.60%255C%253Ax%255C%253A0.12%255C%253A-%255C%253A2.2%257D%257B28.6%255C%253A%2B%255C%253A2.20%257D%253D%255C%253A0.04" alt="\frac{28.60\:x\:0.12\:-\:2.2}{28.6\:+\:2.20}=\:0.04" /></div>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a id="link11C" href="#dialog_for_link11C"> C. $4.31%</a></span></strong>

<div id="dialog_for_link11C" class="enhanceable_content dialog"><strong>Incorrect. </strong> This answer occurs if you forget to increase the value of the dividend.</div>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</blockquote>

<p> </p>

</blockquote>