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harrisj
Community Participant

Allow Liking in Announcements

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Have a faculty member who has clicked Allow Liking for an Announcement - that's it, no allow graders, no sorting.

But, no like icon appears for the students.  We've verified that it works for discussions, but does not for Announcements.

What are we missing?  A setting in the course, in global settings for the system admin?

Can't seem to find any reference to liking in announcements in the literature/guides/discussions...

Thanks!

27 Replies
nhein
Community Member

Still not functional. From the looks of date of the thread the fix isn't going to occur?  I just sent out an announcement asking for confirmation of reading by liking the announcement.  Makes me look like I really know what's going on with my students. The option needs to be pulled until it can be fixed. 

kona
Community Coach
Community Coach

 @nhein , I just checked and the liking feature seems to be working fine for me in Announcements. Have you checked with your test student to see if it's working or not? If not, and you checked the box to allow liking, then you need to report this to Canvas Support because it should be working.

nhein
Community Member

I have checked the test student and it was not functional. Thanks for the comment. N

Sent from my iPad

kona
Community Coach
Community Coach

As an update liking in announcements should be working. My Canvas Support ticket for this shows that the problem was solved as of 2-22-16.

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kona
Community Coach
Community Coach

And just to double-check, you have clicked the box to allow liking? Also, this feature doesn't allow students to like your original announcement, it only allows them to like any comments to the announcement. This is by design - https://community.canvaslms.com/docs/DOC-6095 

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kimberly_smith1
Community Participant

After reading this thread, I would just like to confirm that I am understanding this 'allow liking' thing...

The 'allow liking' option in announcements will not be of use if the instructor's goal is to see if students are reading their announcments, but can be used to see if students read/like the replies made to the instructor;s inital announcement by other students, yes? And, if instructors wanted to, they could 'reply' to their own announcement, and then students could 'like' the instructor's reply, yes? If so, then...

As a work-around... if a instructor wanted to use this function to assess whether or not students are reading their announcements, could they post the annoucement twice - once as the original and once as a 'reply' (or maybe the original = "read the info below" and the 'reply' = the actual announcement) - and then students would go in and 'like' the instructor's reply? If so...

Would it also be possible to set announcements as 'locked for comments' (so that students can't actually post their own comments), but they could still 'like' the instructor's reply? Or, is it that the 'locked for comments' needs to be turned off for students to "like" a reply? 

I see that Seth Buttner has submitted the idea https://community.canvaslms.com/ideas/8878-allow-liking-of-initial-announcements  I voted yes, though I agree with Sarah Phinney that a better button for this goal might be 'I have read this announcement'.

One issue with this is that you don’t get to see “who” liked something. So even if you had 20 liked you wouldn’t be sure which students saw it. 

kimberly_smith1
Community Participant

Ahhh, I see. Thank you for clarifying. I hadn't ever actually thought before about tracking students' announcement reading. Of course, the way we often discover students haven't been reading announcements is after they miss an extra credit opportunity or forget to take an exam (I post reminders), and get an email that is answered in announcements. So, I could see some value in tracking announcement reading. Conversely, for those who don't read announcements now, having a box to check may not make them any more inclined to do so (e.g. check the box but not actually read the content), while those who read them now don't need a box to check.