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kstewart1
New Member

How do I restrict access to a powerpoint for students?

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I do not want students to download or edit the document...just view it. 

1 Solution

Even using a PPS is not effect. Simply changing the extension would allow a student to open it in edit mode and have PowerPoint "fix" the "corrupted" data.

The best solution to allow viewing but not editing is to publish the presentation in a non-editable format. I would recommend looking into iSpring PowerPoint Converter​ (free version: https://www.ispringsolutions.com/ispring-free) or Adobe Captivate for conversion.

We use Captivate to export presentations to HTML5. While the Canvas files area supports loading HTML5 to them, we have found that there are issues with more complex presentations. So, we store them on a separate server and embed/link them into our Canvas pages.

If you use Flash, instead, you shouldn't have any problem with loading the files directly into Canvas (it'll be a single file). However, I wouldn't recommend Flash as it is now a legacy format which many major browsers have already drop all support for. HTML5 is supported everywhere, including mobile, making it a far more versatile option.

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3 Replies
Robbie_Grant
Community Coach
Community Coach

 @kstewart1 ​,


There is not really a way to restrict students from downloading or editing a ppt file.  What I would recommend is putting up the PPS file. 

Robbie

Even using a PPS is not effect. Simply changing the extension would allow a student to open it in edit mode and have PowerPoint "fix" the "corrupted" data.

The best solution to allow viewing but not editing is to publish the presentation in a non-editable format. I would recommend looking into iSpring PowerPoint Converter​ (free version: https://www.ispringsolutions.com/ispring-free) or Adobe Captivate for conversion.

We use Captivate to export presentations to HTML5. While the Canvas files area supports loading HTML5 to them, we have found that there are issues with more complex presentations. So, we store them on a separate server and embed/link them into our Canvas pages.

If you use Flash, instead, you shouldn't have any problem with loading the files directly into Canvas (it'll be a single file). However, I wouldn't recommend Flash as it is now a legacy format which many major browsers have already drop all support for. HTML5 is supported everywhere, including mobile, making it a far more versatile option.

Chris_Hofer
Community Coach
Community Coach

Hi  @kstewart1 ​...

I wanted to check in with you since there hasn't been any activity in this thread since September 12th.  Did the replies from  @Robbie_Grant ​ and cesbrandt​ help to answer your question?  If you want, you can mark one of their responses as "Correct".  For now, I am going to mark this question as "Assumed Answered", but that won't prevent you or others from posting additional replies to this topic.  Thanks Katie.