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ismael_lara1
New Member

How to view assignment submissions without an outcome rating?

Hello, I hope someone can help me. My institution is using Canvas as a supplement to our live training that takes place over several weeks. We built over 100 courses, with about 5 assignments/discussion forums each. And each of those assignments and discussion forums has an attached rubric containing a single outcome (no criterion). The rubric was a non-scoring rubric (ie “Remove points from rubric” was selected”).

During the training, we had multiple people responsible for grading each assignment and discussion forum. Grading consisted of entering a numerical score + checking off an appropriate rating on the rubric/outcome. After our training was over and we went to look back at some of the assignments, we noticed that some of our graders entered a numerical score but neglected to check off a rating on the rubric.

Now I wonder how many of these assignment submissions don't have an outcome score. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to retrieve this information other than manually going into each assignment submission and checking?

Here's what I've tried:

  • Canvas provides an outcome report, but we found that it was incomplete/unreliable and are working with Canvas to troubleshoot. Some submissions containing outcome scores are included, others are missing entirely from the report.
  • Using the Canvas API, the Submissions API specifically does not include Outcome scores in the response. The Assignments API will tell me whether I set up the assignment with an Outcome attached, but that's not the same as saying that an outcome score was selected during grading.
1 Reply
Robbie_Grant
Community Coach
Community Coach

 @ismael_lara1 ,

First, I want to apologize for your question sitting in the community for so long without a response.

 

Second, it looks like you have stumped the Canvas Community.  Were you able to find an answer to your question? I am going to go ahead and mark this question as answered because there hasn't been any more activity in a while, so I assume that you have the information that you need. If you still have a question about this or if you have information that you would like to share with the community, by all means, please do come back and leave a comment.

How we keep your questions flowing!

Robbie

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