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geiger
Community Participant

Is there a way to add units to numerical answer questions?

In the physical sciences, a numerical answer is meaningless without units.  As far as I can tell, there doesn't seem to be a way to show units with the answer.  For example, if I as a quiz question such as:

What is the density of a cube of metal with and edge length of 1.00 cm that has a mass of 3.50 g?

I would expect the response 3.50 g/cm3

The way I did this in another course management system was to  ask the question with a variable followed by the units, i.e.,

What is the density of a cube of metal with and edge length of 1.00 cm that has a mass of 3.50 g?

[l1] g/cm3

Yes, I know that something like this is being voted on right now, but I must be missing something.  There must be a way to do this now, unless there no scientists or engineers on the development team.

25 Replies
chofer
Community Coach
Community Coach

Hello  @geiger ‌...

I am so sorry to see that your question has been sitting here in the Canvas Community since before Christmas, and it hasn't gotten any replies.  It appears that you may have stumped members of the Community.  Have you been able to come up with a solution to your question since you first posted?  Or, are you still looking for help?  If you have found a solution, would you be willing to share it here with the Community?  Looking forward to hearing back from you, David!

geiger
Community Participant

Thank you for your concern. No, I have not found a solution.

--

David K. Geiger

Distinguished Teaching Professor

ISC 323

Department of Chemistry

SUNY-College at Geneseo

Geneseo, NY 14454

ph: 585-245-5452

fax: 585-245-5288

www.geneseo.edu/geiger

tross
Community Champion

Can you make what you need work with a Formula question type?   Not exactly what you need but similar to the workaround you have used before.

geiger
Community Participant

What I have done is to simply use the numerical answer problem type and to

add at the end, for example,

Robbie_Grant
Community Coach
Community Coach

 @geiger ,

Were you able to find an answer to your question? I am going to go ahead and mark this question as answered because there hasn't been any more activity in a while so I assume that you have the information that you need. If you still have a question about this or if you have information that you would like to share with the community, by all means, please do come back and leave a comment.  Also, if this question has been answered by one of the previous replies, please feel free to mark that answer as correct.

 

Robbie

uc0ith
Community Member

This is my first day of Canvas training and as an Engineering Lecturer I'm finding this frustrating!  Surely there must be a way to have a numeric answer which will include specific text for the units?

rgellert
Community Participant

David,

At the college where I teach we have just switched Learning Management Systems from Moodle to Canvas. Canvas is not very scientifically friendly. It does not offer multiple number input nor the ability to use numeric input with numbers less than 10(-4), 1e-4.

So here is a work around for your dilemma.

Use Question type = Fill in multiple blanks

I will use your example but rephrase the problem.

A cube of metal with and edge length of 1.00 cm has a mass of 3.50 g. Provide the required answer with units below.

The density of the metal = [response1]

240803_pastedImage_2.png

Alternatively,

A cube of metal with and edge length of 1.00 cm has a mass of 3.50 g. Provide the required answer with units below.

The density of the metal = [response1],[response2]. This separates numeric input followed by typed in units.

240804_pastedImage_3.png

240805_pastedImage_4.png

If the students types in 3.5, or 3.50g/cm3 both would be marked wrong. You must therefore think of all possible variations of you will accept as a correct response. System reads input as typed, it is not case sensitive. Significant figures are not address with this question type. WYSIWYG.

Regards,

Robert Gellert

Prof. Chemistry, Chair

Glendale Community College

geiger
Community Participant

Robert,

Thanks for the suggestion.  I will give this a go.

rgellert
Community Participant

Best wishes,

Robert

Sent from my iPhone