cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
kerry_nolte
Community Member

Is using peer grading with moderation possible?

Jump to solution

Within my seminar I have students in discussion groups. I am looking for them to complete a group participation rubric for each student in their group and then was hoping to combine (or what I thought was moderate) those scores into their group participation grade. I thought that I could assign the peer reviews to group member and then moderate those but as far as I can tell I can't have students reviewing and then moderate those. Any thoughts on how to make this work?

1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
kblack
Community Champion

Hi  @kerry_nolte ​ - Well, by its very design, a peer review is intended to be used to assess another student's submission of something, such as a paper, and the grade goes to the student who submitted the original paper--NOT the reviewer, which (as the documentation notes) would necessitate the creation of a separate assignment.  While in theory it is possible to set up a peer review assignment where there is no original submission at all, frankly it would be a lot of trouble to:  a.) manually assign each student the other group members in that group as peer reviewers, and b.) have students figure out where to submit the peer review, since (again) without a student submission the only place they can spot that they have to do it is in the "To Do" area or the Dashboard.  (See this document:  How do I know if I have a peer review assignment to complete? )  Oh, and a moderated assignment will not work, since that will only work with TAs.

All things considered, my own opinion--and one that our faculty members have tended to do--is either create a Google Survey or use a Graded Survey within Canvas to have students complete assessments of one's fellow group members.  While they will not have the benefit of a clickable rubric as they would in a regular peer review, you could probably still display the rubric as part of a question and ask them to give their fellow students the appropriate number of points.  The main problem is having them do this for each student in the group.  Perhaps a short answer question where you ask them to name the specific student in question followed by the rubric question would be the best way to handle this.  I have also had instructors simply resort to a drop-down menu listing all the class members for them to select a student, though that can get messy--especially in a big class. 

Perhaps some others in the Community have some of their own ideas to approach this, but I believe that generally an online survey of some sort would work best for you.

View solution in original post

2 Replies
kblack
Community Champion

Hi  @kerry_nolte ​ - Well, by its very design, a peer review is intended to be used to assess another student's submission of something, such as a paper, and the grade goes to the student who submitted the original paper--NOT the reviewer, which (as the documentation notes) would necessitate the creation of a separate assignment.  While in theory it is possible to set up a peer review assignment where there is no original submission at all, frankly it would be a lot of trouble to:  a.) manually assign each student the other group members in that group as peer reviewers, and b.) have students figure out where to submit the peer review, since (again) without a student submission the only place they can spot that they have to do it is in the "To Do" area or the Dashboard.  (See this document:  How do I know if I have a peer review assignment to complete? )  Oh, and a moderated assignment will not work, since that will only work with TAs.

All things considered, my own opinion--and one that our faculty members have tended to do--is either create a Google Survey or use a Graded Survey within Canvas to have students complete assessments of one's fellow group members.  While they will not have the benefit of a clickable rubric as they would in a regular peer review, you could probably still display the rubric as part of a question and ask them to give their fellow students the appropriate number of points.  The main problem is having them do this for each student in the group.  Perhaps a short answer question where you ask them to name the specific student in question followed by the rubric question would be the best way to handle this.  I have also had instructors simply resort to a drop-down menu listing all the class members for them to select a student, though that can get messy--especially in a big class. 

Perhaps some others in the Community have some of their own ideas to approach this, but I believe that generally an online survey of some sort would work best for you.

View solution in original post

Thanks so much  @kblack ​. I appreciate your response. Thanks for saving me the time of trying to make it fit my needs inappropriate!