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phanson
Community Member

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Hi,

I have an easier time remembering student names when I know something simple about them. I ask for some memorable information from the students on the first day and get some answers, e.g. "I live on a dairy farm".  I'd like to be able to take private notes about individual students on canvas, and maybe even have reminders to follow up on them. For example if I feel like I neglected giving a student full attention I'd like to be able to write a note on the interaction have have that note come up during the next class. Does canvas have these capabilities?

thanks

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Stefanie
Community Team
Community Team

 @phanson ​, I teach a fully online class, so my use case is somewhat different; I don't need a reminder when I am face-to-face with students, but I do frequently need to consult information I've previously learned about the students so that I have context when something (the inevitable something) comes up. For this, I enable the Notes column in the Gradebook. Our first course activity is an ungraded getting-to-know-you icebreaker discussion, and if a student mentions something there that I think will have relevance later, I add it to the Notes column. If a student cannot complete an assignment due to an illness or other life event, and/or asks for an extension on an assignment, I add the relevant info to the Notes column. This gives me the clues I might need to evaluate issues as they arise. You can also switch to Individual View in the Gradebook to see an individual student's performance, and the Notes column will display there as well.

You can follow the instructions at this lesson from the Canvas Guides to enable Notes in the Gradebook:  How do I use the Notes column in the Gradebook?

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2 Replies
chofer
Community Coach
Community Coach

Hi  @phanson ​...

I'm not aware of anything that Canvas can currently do that would allow you to do this, but I was actually thinking of an LTI app that is available to integrate with Canvas called "Dropout Detective".  We just implemented it at our Technical College, and we are having a few of our instructors try it out this semester before we make it available to all instructors.  So far, it's been really helpful, and we've gotten some good feedback.  "Dropout Detective" would allow you to see a "Risk Index" for your students in a given course to see who is most at risk in your course.  All the student names are listed, and you can click on the names for more information.  When you click on a student name, you can see their missing assignments, and there is also an area for "Call Notes" where you could certainly type in some notes about the student (as you've mentioned above).  Here is some more information for you about this LTI tool: Alliance Partner - AspirEDU

Hope this helps!!!

Stefanie
Community Team
Community Team

 @phanson ​, I teach a fully online class, so my use case is somewhat different; I don't need a reminder when I am face-to-face with students, but I do frequently need to consult information I've previously learned about the students so that I have context when something (the inevitable something) comes up. For this, I enable the Notes column in the Gradebook. Our first course activity is an ungraded getting-to-know-you icebreaker discussion, and if a student mentions something there that I think will have relevance later, I add it to the Notes column. If a student cannot complete an assignment due to an illness or other life event, and/or asks for an extension on an assignment, I add the relevant info to the Notes column. This gives me the clues I might need to evaluate issues as they arise. You can also switch to Individual View in the Gradebook to see an individual student's performance, and the Notes column will display there as well.

You can follow the instructions at this lesson from the Canvas Guides to enable Notes in the Gradebook:  How do I use the Notes column in the Gradebook?

View solution in original post