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matthewse
Community Participant

Require 100% on quiz

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I created a quiz with the intention that students would learn the material by answering the questions. I gave them the ability to retake it as many times as possible. Is there a way to require them to get a 100% in order to get the credit for taking the quiz?

1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
James
Community Champion

 @matthewse ​,

You've ran into the same problem that many face. Modules are used to accomplish organization and they're also used to enforce prerequisites and sometimes those two don't mesh well together.

If you really want them to get 100% (I've found that some students don't want to put the effort into getting 100%), here is a work-around that requires some manual intervention on your part, so you'll have to decide how important an all or nothing grade is. You'll need to repeat this process as you see fit to update the grades as students complete the quiz with 100%.

Overview

To make this work, we need to create two assignments. The first is the quiz and the second is a fake-assignment that holds the actual grade. Everyone gets a grade for the first one but you only put in a grade for the second one when they have obtained their 100%. Some people would put a 0 in at some point to encourage them to work on getting their 100%.

You can create the real quiz as either a graded quiz or a practice quiz depending on your preferences and how your gradebook is configured. A practice quiz will not show up in the gradebook as a separate assignment, whereas a graded quiz will so you'll have two columns in the gradebook.

Create a fake assignment that is worth the points you want the quiz to be worth. My personal preferences would be to use a complete/incomplete grading scheme and create it as a "no submission" assignment, but there are other combinations that would work.

Weighted Grades w/ two columns in gradebook

If you are using a weighted gradebook, then you can create your real quiz as graded quiz and place it into an assignment group worth 0% of the grade and put the fake assignment into a category worth points.

When students get the 100% on the real quiz, you give them a grade for the fake assignment. If you're using a complete/incomplete, then it's as easy as checking a checkbox.

Because the real quiz has a column in the gradebook, this method has the benefit of being able to click at the top of the real quiz column in the gradebook to sort by score. That way, all the people with 100% will be lumped together and it will be easier to check them off. If you temporarily place the assignments next to each other on the assignments page, then the columns can be adjacent in the gradebook (assuming you sort by assignment group and not due date), and it will minimize the mouse movements and chances for mistakes.

The downside is that students will see two grades, one of which isn't worth any real points.

Non-Weighted Grades or One column in gradebook

If you are not using a weighted gradebook, then you can't assign the real quiz to a non-weighted assignment group.

In this case, you'll have to use a practice quiz. The problem with practice quizzes is that they don't get a column in the gradebook. I say it's a problem because it makes the work harder, but some people find not cluttering the gradebook to be desirable and may want to use a practice quiz with weighted grades.

To get to their grades, go into the Moderate Grades button from the quiz page. You can then scan through for the students who have 100% and go to the gradebook and check them off as completed.

Another option is to export the Student Analysis report into Excel. It's available on the Quiz Statistics page. It does give you every attempt for the students, but if you sort it by the score, you'll be to able to quickly see who has the 100% and, although there are duplicate entries for each student, it is unlikely that a student continued taking the quiz after they got their 100%.

There ways to download the gradebook, transfer this information over the existing grades (beyond the scope of this message), and then upload it back into Canvas. But unless you have huge classes, it's probably easier to do the process by hand directly within Canvas than messing with the Excel spreadsheets.

View solution in original post

7 Replies
JGarton
Community Contributor

Evan,

You could put the quiz in a module and add a requirement for that module. Set the requirement of a 100% score on the quiz for the module to be marked as completed. The quiz could be in a module by itself.

module requirement.png

dhulsey
Community Champion

Hey, Evan! You can do this if you organize your content into modules. Here are some relevant pages from the Canvas Guides:

How do I add requirements to a Module?

How do I require students to move through each Module item in order?

How do I set up prerequisite Modules?

Using modules, module prerequisites, and module requirements, you can manage the order, pace, and success rate required to advance in the course. Here is an item from one of my modules that requires students to score 15 out of 15 before they may proceed to the next item in the module.

Perfection.png

I hope that helps!

chofer
Community Coach
Community Coach

Hi  @matthewse ​...

Did either of the suggestions from JGarton​ or  @dhulsey ​ help answer your question?  I wanted to check in since we haven't heard from you in a while re: this topic.  Please let us know...thanks.

matthewse
Community Participant

Thank you for checking in. Because of the way I designed my online content

I wasn't able to try their suggestions. I may try it on future classes

though.

Evan Matthews

Sent from mobile phone.

On Oct 18, 2015 8:23 PM, "chofer@morainepark.edu" <instructure@jiveon.com>

James
Community Champion

 @matthewse ​,

You've ran into the same problem that many face. Modules are used to accomplish organization and they're also used to enforce prerequisites and sometimes those two don't mesh well together.

If you really want them to get 100% (I've found that some students don't want to put the effort into getting 100%), here is a work-around that requires some manual intervention on your part, so you'll have to decide how important an all or nothing grade is. You'll need to repeat this process as you see fit to update the grades as students complete the quiz with 100%.

Overview

To make this work, we need to create two assignments. The first is the quiz and the second is a fake-assignment that holds the actual grade. Everyone gets a grade for the first one but you only put in a grade for the second one when they have obtained their 100%. Some people would put a 0 in at some point to encourage them to work on getting their 100%.

You can create the real quiz as either a graded quiz or a practice quiz depending on your preferences and how your gradebook is configured. A practice quiz will not show up in the gradebook as a separate assignment, whereas a graded quiz will so you'll have two columns in the gradebook.

Create a fake assignment that is worth the points you want the quiz to be worth. My personal preferences would be to use a complete/incomplete grading scheme and create it as a "no submission" assignment, but there are other combinations that would work.

Weighted Grades w/ two columns in gradebook

If you are using a weighted gradebook, then you can create your real quiz as graded quiz and place it into an assignment group worth 0% of the grade and put the fake assignment into a category worth points.

When students get the 100% on the real quiz, you give them a grade for the fake assignment. If you're using a complete/incomplete, then it's as easy as checking a checkbox.

Because the real quiz has a column in the gradebook, this method has the benefit of being able to click at the top of the real quiz column in the gradebook to sort by score. That way, all the people with 100% will be lumped together and it will be easier to check them off. If you temporarily place the assignments next to each other on the assignments page, then the columns can be adjacent in the gradebook (assuming you sort by assignment group and not due date), and it will minimize the mouse movements and chances for mistakes.

The downside is that students will see two grades, one of which isn't worth any real points.

Non-Weighted Grades or One column in gradebook

If you are not using a weighted gradebook, then you can't assign the real quiz to a non-weighted assignment group.

In this case, you'll have to use a practice quiz. The problem with practice quizzes is that they don't get a column in the gradebook. I say it's a problem because it makes the work harder, but some people find not cluttering the gradebook to be desirable and may want to use a practice quiz with weighted grades.

To get to their grades, go into the Moderate Grades button from the quiz page. You can then scan through for the students who have 100% and go to the gradebook and check them off as completed.

Another option is to export the Student Analysis report into Excel. It's available on the Quiz Statistics page. It does give you every attempt for the students, but if you sort it by the score, you'll be to able to quickly see who has the 100% and, although there are duplicate entries for each student, it is unlikely that a student continued taking the quiz after they got their 100%.

There ways to download the gradebook, transfer this information over the existing grades (beyond the scope of this message), and then upload it back into Canvas. But unless you have huge classes, it's probably easier to do the process by hand directly within Canvas than messing with the Excel spreadsheets.

View solution in original post

matthewse
Community Participant

Thank you for the ideas.

-Evan

matthewse
Community Participant

Yes. Thank you!

-Evan

On Sun, Oct 18, 2015 at 9:37 PM, kona@richland.edu <instructure@jiveon.com>