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michellemeazell
Community Contributor

See who clicked on things

In my old LMS, I was able to both see what my student had clicked on in "content" as well as view the particular "content" item and see who had clicked it on it, how many times it had been viewed as well as time durations.  This is CRITICAL in freshman courses to be sure that these students are really grasping they have to utilize these resources/files/etc..  This is also huge in online courses as well as working with academic integrity issues.  I've looked and cannot seem to find anything like this in Canvas and it is beyond me how a product that is marketed to higher education doesn't have this feature that I've used in three other LMS systems since 2001.  If I'm just blind and missing this feature in my course/on my items/etc.. please someone, I beg you, point them out to me!  THANK YOU!

46 Replies
kona
Community Coach
Community Coach

I agree that we need more access to this information, but on the admin side of Canvas you can access the information you're talking about for #4 & 5 - so IP address and exactly when students clicked on things. My issue as an admin is that (1) I wish faculty had access to this information on their own from their course and (2) wish we had access to more long term IP address history and that the report was more user-friendly.

Yes, yes, yes!!

ambouche
Community Participant

I know that admins have this information.  But I need it almost every day, all the time, and I am not an admin.  If it exists for admins why can't it be available to the faculty who actually use the information?

kona
Community Coach
Community Coach

I 100% agree that faculty need access to this information. I just wanted to make sure you (and anyone else who came across this discussion) were aware that the information does exist in Canvas and can be accessed, especially for cases of potential academic dishonesty.

sworrell
Community Participant

This hits the on thing I miss the most "I see that they have accessed the assignment quite a few times, but in Canvas I can only see the most recent date of access, not all the dates"

A log of click times/dates would be helpful.  I liked this feature in poor old Moodle:) back in the day.

The other issue with these logs in Canvas is that they only show the URL accessed. So you have to either know what all of your course URLs are or you have to click on each to find out what it is. ANGEL actually showed the name of what they clicked on for easy reading. It would also show not only access, but submissions all in the same log. In Canvas, we have to look at the log, see when they accessed it (which is listed in GMT) and then go back to the assignment, find their submission and see when it was submitted (in the school's time zone). It's very time consuming when trying to find out if students accessed other materials while testing or other similar checks.

That sounds like a good idea, but at first glance, it wouldn't appear to me that you can actually track individual student activity?

Really new to Canvas, so perhaps there's a way to put a "variable" in the link that would allow differentiating between students? You then have to deal with possible FERPA consequences though, as you'd be sending that student ID and their activity to a third-party provider.

sweetera
Community Participant

The existing data analytics are a great start.  It would be very useful to see what was clicked, for how long, and at what time.  This feeds important data for course design, resource allocation, and ensuring that schools are sensitive to the real ways students engage.

sworrell
Community Participant

Spot on Rachael!

For me as a high school teacher, I have some kids taking online/hybrid courses for the first time and this fact coupled with the immaturity (I don't really mean it in a bad way) of some kids at this age, make detailed usage information invaluable for helping them succeed.

sweetera
Community Participant

Thanks.

As a designer, I know that is it important to reach your students and not design on "fantasies" about course success.  Examples might be:

  • Videos and readings that are too long.  It is important to see that students didn't watch or click so that adjustments can be made.  Analytics aren't perfect, but they are a start.
  • In Higher Ed. many students work and do all their homework crammed on the weekend. Teachers can make or break the experience by choosing due date patterns that help students complete the classes without washing out.  Many teachers are unaware of how old-school mindsets and/or overly controlling settings in an LMS can negatively impact completion.
  • In K-12, we would love to imagine students going home every day after school and diligently doing their homework. Seeing what is really happening can help with intervention for individuals and/or creative solutions like flipped classroom where students listen to teacher's lecture at home and then work on homework projects together at school.