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bizzeerho
Community Member

Uploading a Large Video to a Course

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How do I upload a video larger than 500MB in a course?  How do I compress the file down if it is a recorded power point presentation?

2 Solutions

Accepted Solutions
chofer
Community Coach
Community Coach

 @bizzeerho ​...

While I don't have an answer for you, I wanted to let you know that I'm going to modify the title of your topic because you're asking the same question in the body of your message.  I'll also add some keywords to your posting so that it is easier for people to search for should they have similar questions.  If the re-named title doesn't reflect what you are asking, please let me know, and I will work with you to make any changes.

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I don't have any experience with it but one of our professors just tried it and absolutely loved it! It's convenient for turning powerpoints into a video with markups, quizzes, etc.

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10 Replies
chofer
Community Coach
Community Coach

 @bizzeerho ​...

While I don't have an answer for you, I wanted to let you know that I'm going to modify the title of your topic because you're asking the same question in the body of your message.  I'll also add some keywords to your posting so that it is easier for people to search for should they have similar questions.  If the re-named title doesn't reflect what you are asking, please let me know, and I will work with you to make any changes.

View solution in original post

Stefanie
Community Team
Community Team

 @bizzeerho ​, I don't have an answer for you either, because (1) I'm not sure you can compress a narrated PPT to get within the 500MB limit, and (2) even if you could get the file uploaded, I don't think the PowerPoint is going to work the way you want it to once it's there. My latter observation reflects the fact that in order to take advantage of all of the PowerPoint features, the end user also has to have a copy of PowerPoint installed on the local machine, and will need to download the huge file and launch PowerPoint in order to view it and hear the audio; Canvas will display static slides, but much of the other functionality is lost, because Canvas is not PowerPoint.

I use many PowerPoints that contain voice-over narration, extensive animations, and other media--but in order to use them in Canvas, I convert them using Articulate Presenter (as well as Engage and Quizmaker) and provide them to my school; they host the file on their server, which gives me a link that I can drop into a module. The link, of course, takes up zero space in Canvas, because the huge file is hosted remotely. Articulate is a very expensive piece of software, so you might want to ask your school if they have a license and/or can convert the PowerPoint file(s) for you to take advantage of the audio and any other features that might be incorporated into it.

With regard to the 500MB upload limit for videos, you might want to add your use case to this feature idea that is currently open for voting and commentary:

Or did I misunderstand your original question? Is it a PowerPoint file, or is it a recording of a PowerPoint presentation with audio? If the latter, your best bet is to upload it to YouTube and embed it in Canvas. There's lots of commentary and good advice here in the Community about how to leverage YouTube, so let us know if you decide to go that route so we can direct you to some resources from those who have been there. Smiley Happy

canvas_admin
Community Champion

Zeretha,

If you're using Office Mix, I believe you can change the resolution or compression rate, but I'm not 100% sure about that.

I took one of our professor's mixes and ran it through Camtasia and in the export settings, I just cut the quality down to where there is still a good balance between the quality of the video and size but the file comes in under the 500MB limit.

Ooh, Office Mix (website)....or Office Mix (EduApps)...gotta give that a try. Smiley Happy

I don't have any experience with it but one of our professors just tried it and absolutely loved it! It's convenient for turning powerpoints into a video with markups, quizzes, etc.

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ccalderon
Community Champion

 @bizzeerho ​ - we run into this same problem quite frequently and recommend two tools to students. Both are open source and compatible with Mac and Windows. Here are links to the download pages:

Miro Video Converter

Hand Brake

Hope these help! They have worked well for us in the past.

Crista

Here are the options for Mix download sizes - I found out if you upgrade your Mix in PPT (just did that) then you have 4 options instead of the three.

kona
Community Coach
Community Coach

 @bizzeerho ​, it looks like you've got a lot of great possible solutions for your issue. Have you looked at any of them to see what might work?

buddyhall
Community Champion

Handbrake is a great option, but another option is to break the powerpoint presentation into parts.  It's best to do this as you change topics in the presentation. Then it's easy for students to go back and review the information about a particular topic.