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MichaelB
Community Participant

Visual Disabilities?

I came across an issue that I think is a problem with Canvas and I wonder how to address it. 

I have a student who, due to diabetes and albinism, has severe sight impairment. Canvas can be helpful for him normally because he can increase the zoom to be able to read information. 

I was giving an anatomy test where I had uploaded graphics into a quiz.  Trying to increase the zoom on something like this, simply created pixelation, even though I'd uploaded fairly high quality PNG files into the quiz. 

It seems that if Canvas could have some type of function where a scalable graphic could be uploaded and the zoom was controlled by Canvas rather than a browser, this type of issue could be avoided.  When we are working with the office of disability services and trying to meet ADA standards, I need a way to work with the vision impaired. 

Luckily, this course met in person so I was able to print out large graphics for him to use and then email me the answers.  If this was an online course, I wouldn't have had this option. 

Is there any way to make something like this work? 

7 Replies
kmeeusen
Community Coach
Community Coach

Hi  @MichaelB ‌

First and foremost, thank you for thinking of your less enabled students. And, as an UDL feature, this could help more students than just the visually impaired.

Please check out this resource from Community Coach  @chofer ‌ about creating a "Lightbox Effect" in Canvas.

By the way, when I taught my very first hybrid A&P course many years ago, the first day of class in walks a lady with a white cane helped in by her husband. No help from our DSS office, totally inaccessible LMS, blah, blah blah. We got her through the course quite nicely, but it was a lot of hard work by everybody. I told myself I would never go through that again, and have dutifully studied online Accessibility since. I will also share this question with the https://community.canvaslms.com/groups/accessibility group in here, and see what other help they may have to offer.

I hope this is helpful.

MichaelB
Community Participant

Thank you, Kelley.  I appreciate your pointing me to Chris's Lightbox effect.  That could certainly be a start toward helping this student.  As this is my first time having a student with this severe of a visual disability (shocking after 23 years of teaching), I am winging my way through this.

Having an LMS that really is there for the instructor, rather than the instructor having to find ways to make it work would be of great benefit.

don_bryn
Community Champion

I think the true proper way to handle this is through Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), because it is the WC3 spec for presenting the same information in different formats. The current spec allows delivering different style sheets based on the user's device, screen, etc.   So if a user is using a visual-assisting device, a much larger or higher quality image can be loaded and/or presented in a larger container.

I'm not sure Canvas is up to this yet, so you might need a workaround.

MichaelB
Community Participant

Would a CSS actually be able to clearly zoom on a photo if it were not some type of scalable vector graphic.  Couldn't it simply pixelate whatever photo is using? 

I like the idea of users being able to go into their general settings and set the visual-assistance settings. 

don_bryn
Community Champion

With CSS, you provide different quality images that will be displayed depending on the users device.   So if the user's device requests high-definition or larger images, the page should load the proper CSS file that would then load all of the display settings appropriate to that device.

Robbie_Grant
Community Coach
Community Coach

 @MichaelB ,

Were you able to find an answer to your question? I am going to go ahead and mark this question as answered because there hasn't been any more activity in a while so I assume that you have the information that you need. If you still have a question about this or if you have information that you would like to share with the community, by all means, please do come back and leave a comment.  Also, if this question has been answered by one of the previous replies, please feel free to mark that answer as correct.

 

Robbie

MichaelB
Community Participant

I just noticed this response 3 years later.  The answer is NO, I never found a good answer to the question.  In the midst of teaching courses, it's hard to find time to learn CSS in order teach the course.