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campbell_oxland
Community Participant

numerical answer in table cell

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Looking to create a numerical answer question where the text boxes for the answers are within table cells. As below

Calculate the total revenue for the following movement in price. The first has been done for you.

Price ($)
Quantity demanded (units)Total revenue ($)
270140
460text box wanted here
650text box wanted here
840text box wanted here
1030text box wanted here
2 Solutions

Accepted Solutions
James
Community Champion

 @campbell_oxland ​,

 @chofer ​ has answered the question asked in the heading about numerical answers. You cannot have multiple numeric answer questions, which has been a source of frustration for many of us.

However, you can have multiple text boxes and in a table like you illustrated. You choose "Fill in Multiple Blanks" as the question type.  You set it up like this:

200713_pastedImage_0.png

The Show Possible Answers has four values in the drop down: a1, a2, a3, and a4. You put in the possible answers (which are actually the correct answers) for each one.

Then, when the student sees the question, they see something like this (I had to do a lot of formatting to get the table to look reasonable, yours will probably look more compact and without the lines unless you figure out how to style them)

200777_pastedImage_1.png

Oops, I just realized that the text of the question got lost -- oh well, that wasn't the important part, just add it before the table.

One huge caveat though, these are not numeric answer questions. They are fill in the blank answers, so someone could enter "two-hundred forty" as an answer. That's unlikely, but since you're asking for dollars, someone might enter $240.00 and that would be different than 240. Even $240 is different from 240. So you need to be careful to include the different acceptable answers or be very explicit in your instructions about what is acceptable.

Having to list all of the various ways it could be written generally make it undesirable for math content. The tables are a pain to create until you get them figured out and then they're still not easy. You can also use four separate numeric answer questions like Chris pointed out, but you're still going to struggle with the table. But at least then you have the freedom to let Canvas determine whether the responses are numerically equivalent.

Using a formula question and only asking for one of them is another alternative approach. The question is If the total revenue is $140 when the price is 2 and the quantity demanded is 70, find the total revenue when the price is [p] and the quantity demanded is [q]. Then you let [p] be a random number between 4 and 10 and [q] be a random number between 30 and 60. Or whatever - you're not limited like you are with this question. You also have the benefit that you can generate a bunch of different answers.

Of course, the formula question would miss out on the concept you're trying to illustrate that as price goes up demand goes down. There's no way to do that with the formula questions as they'll only see one of the values. Of course, if you limit it to the values you have given, then at least it will have a higher price and a lower demand.

View solution in original post

chofer
Community Coach
Community Coach

This is awesome,  @James !  Looks like it took some extra work, but the end result looks pretty neat.  Thanks for sharing!

View solution in original post

8 Replies
chofer
Community Coach
Community Coach

Hi  @campbell_oxland ​...

You won't be able to create a table like this with fillable cells.  What you may want to do is create a "Text (No Question)" row in your quiz and include this table with labels for the four areas you want your students to answer (for example, "A", "B", "C", and "D").  Then, under this "Text (No Question)" row, you would have your four questions as maybe "Fill In the Blank" or "Numerical Answer"...something like "What is the total revenue for box 'A'?"  Would this "work-around" solution meet your needs?

James
Community Champion

 @campbell_oxland ​,

 @chofer ​ has answered the question asked in the heading about numerical answers. You cannot have multiple numeric answer questions, which has been a source of frustration for many of us.

However, you can have multiple text boxes and in a table like you illustrated. You choose "Fill in Multiple Blanks" as the question type.  You set it up like this:

200713_pastedImage_0.png

The Show Possible Answers has four values in the drop down: a1, a2, a3, and a4. You put in the possible answers (which are actually the correct answers) for each one.

Then, when the student sees the question, they see something like this (I had to do a lot of formatting to get the table to look reasonable, yours will probably look more compact and without the lines unless you figure out how to style them)

200777_pastedImage_1.png

Oops, I just realized that the text of the question got lost -- oh well, that wasn't the important part, just add it before the table.

One huge caveat though, these are not numeric answer questions. They are fill in the blank answers, so someone could enter "two-hundred forty" as an answer. That's unlikely, but since you're asking for dollars, someone might enter $240.00 and that would be different than 240. Even $240 is different from 240. So you need to be careful to include the different acceptable answers or be very explicit in your instructions about what is acceptable.

Having to list all of the various ways it could be written generally make it undesirable for math content. The tables are a pain to create until you get them figured out and then they're still not easy. You can also use four separate numeric answer questions like Chris pointed out, but you're still going to struggle with the table. But at least then you have the freedom to let Canvas determine whether the responses are numerically equivalent.

Using a formula question and only asking for one of them is another alternative approach. The question is If the total revenue is $140 when the price is 2 and the quantity demanded is 70, find the total revenue when the price is [p] and the quantity demanded is [q]. Then you let [p] be a random number between 4 and 10 and [q] be a random number between 30 and 60. Or whatever - you're not limited like you are with this question. You also have the benefit that you can generate a bunch of different answers.

Of course, the formula question would miss out on the concept you're trying to illustrate that as price goes up demand goes down. There's no way to do that with the formula questions as they'll only see one of the values. Of course, if you limit it to the values you have given, then at least it will have a higher price and a lower demand.

View solution in original post

chofer
Community Coach
Community Coach

This is awesome,  @James !  Looks like it took some extra work, but the end result looks pretty neat.  Thanks for sharing!

View solution in original post

campbell_oxland
Community Participant

Thanks so much you really helped.

dpotter
Community Member

This is the same work around that I have developed.

My frustration is that the grading system is using string matching to identify correct answers. There should be the ability for the system to test for numerical equivalencies. Since numeric questions can be created, the system is obviously available. It seems it would be a simple toggle to allow the matching to be based on numerical values as opposed to just string matching. 

As I am creating math quizzes, this happens for me a lot. For example, a simple question could be:

340046_Screen Shot 2020-02-22 at 10.13.15 AM.png

The student should be allowed to submit their answer for z as both 41/2 as well as 20.5 or even 2.50. My work around, as can be seen above, is to try and imagine the various forms a student may submit their answer; however, students are incredibly creative and often submit correct answers that are in a form variant from any of which I had thought.

germank
Community Member

Is it possible to do this with the New Quizzes? Has anyone found a work around? I can't figure out how to get the fill-in-the-blank options in a table in the new quiz because the stem portion of the question (where you can make a table) won't let you insert fill-in-the-blanks and the statement section (where you can create the fill-in-the-blanks) won't let you add a table. 

sbridge
Community Participant

Any progress on this in new quizzes?

GeoffreyWheeler
Community Participant

No,  In New Quizzes, I was not able to do this either.