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Mobile Users

Adventurer

With the introduction of Apple Silicon at last week's Apple WWDC 2020, the Mac is ready for the most significant transition of all time! Will we see Canvas Mobile Apps on macOS for the first time? The truth lies below!

What is Apple Silicon?

Well, you might think that it is Apple's version of Intel's x86 chip, right? Wrong. Apple Silicon is using ARM processors (the AXX processors found in many iOS devices, including the iPhone and iPad).

Apple Silicon

Chart showing the features of Apple Silicon

ADVANCED POWER MANAGEMENT
With advanced power management, performance and battery life will improve, better than ever before.

SECURE ENCLAVE
Secure Enclave will bring best-in-class security, and Apple's high-performance GPU is going to deliver better graphics performance to every Mac. This enhancement makes them even better for professional applications like Final Cut Pro (post-production video editing), Motion (motion graphics), Compressor (video encoding), and high-performance games.

NEURAL ENGINE AND MACHINE LEARNING
Combined with Neural Engine Technology, Apple Silicon chips will make the Mac a fantastic platform for machine learning.

OTHER TECHNOLOGIES
Apple is also bringing many other custom technologies, such as video-display and image-processing engines, that will help make the Mac better than ever before.

Why make the switch from Intel to Apple Silicon?

The transition will establish a universal architecture across all Apple products. It makes it far easier for app developers to create their apps for the entire Apple ecosystem (not just iOS products, but also Macs as well).

(Running mobile apps on the desktop has been made possible for Chromebooks when Android apps and Google Play were introduced.)

Until WWDC 2020, there have been a total of three significant transitions in Apple's history.

  1. 1994-1996: Transitioned from 68k processors to the PowerPC architecture
  2. 2001-2003: Transitioned from Mac OS 9.2 to Mac OS X (the latter now known as just macOS)
  3. 2006-2007: Transitioned from PowerPC to Intel processors (the computer that I am typing this post on is from an Intel-based Mac)
    1. January 2006: Mac OS X 10.4.4 was released, supporting the Intel architecture for the first time
    2. June 2006: First Macs with Intel processors started shipping
    3. June 2007: Transition almost complete
    4. August 2009: Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard dropped support for PowerPC based Macs. Support for PowerPC-only applications still supported on this version, however.

With WWDC 2020, Apple has announced two more major milestones.

  1. 2020-2022: Transition from Intel processors to Apple Silicon is underway
  2. 2020-2021: macOS Big Sur (11.0.x) will be the first version to support these processors. After nearly 20 years, macOS finally moves from version 10 to 11.

Will there be any impact?

App developers can easily convert the apps they have created for iOS products to run on the new Apple silicon to take advantage of its latest technologies and performance. And for the first time, developers can make their iOS and iPadOS apps available on the Mac without having to modify the code. That would mean that the App Store could merge into one unified store in terms of Apple platforms (currently, there is one App Store for iOS, another one for the Mac). For Canvas Mobile developers, there won't be a huge impact; there is no need to rewrite the entire source code from scratch.

The Transition Process

Even though Apple will ship the first Mac with the new Apple silicon processors by the end of 2020 and complete the transition by 2021-2022, Apple will continue to support and release new versions of macOS for Intel-based Macs for years to come, at least until 2025-2026. Furthermore, Apple will continue to sell new Intel-based Macs in the future. The transition to Apple silicon processors represents one of the most significant milestones in the history of the Macintosh.

Universal App Quick Start Program

The Universal App Quick Start Program (UQSP) includes all the tools and resources developers need to build, test, and optimize their next-generation Universal apps for macOS Big Sur. For $500, in addition to developer resources and one-to-one technical support, Apple will send a Developer Transition Kit (DTK) for developing and testing Universal apps. The program will last no more than a full year.

(We don't know if the $500 fee is for an individual or an organization.)

Developer Transition Kit 2 (DTK-2)

(This is actually a Mac Mini, but with an Apple A12Z Bionic processor instead of an Intel Core processor.)

While some developers think of the DTK-2 as a gift from Apple and want to keep it as a token of appreciation, that isn't really true. According to the terms and conditions, the DTK-2 is the property of Apple. Developers must return the kits to Apple within 30 days following the conclusion of the program.
The first time the UQSP program occurred was back to 2005. It cost $1,000 to join, and Apple gave developers a DTK-1, which is a Power Mac G5. As with the new DTK-2 devices, those Macs also had to be returned at the end of the program, although Apple did provide participants with a free first-generation Intel iMac in return.

Canvas and the UQSP

Now, back to Canvas. The main topic is: How can Instructure optimize the performance and layout for Canvas Mobile on macOS? We know that there is a Responsive Layout on the web version of Canvas, and resizing the width changes the view. We want to find out how the layout will look like for Canvas Mobile running on macOS.

Here is a look at Canvas Student on the iPhone in portrait orientation, showing the Assignments page of the Math 3 course. Below it lies the Course Navigation links. Even though it may look similar to the Responsive Layout for the mobile web version of Canvas, the title bar (Assignments - Math 3) is not clickable to get to the Course Navigation page with these same links.

View Assignments

Now, let's look at the iPad view of the History 101 course. It resembles more of the desktop web version of Canvas, with the Course Navigation links on the left side.

View Course Navigation on iPad

What that means is that there are currently some inconsistencies between Canvas Mobile and Canvas Desktop. It's not just the title bar that can open the Course Navigation menu on the iPhone, but also resizing and scaling for font size and accessibility.

352166_Screen Shot 2020-01-06 at 3.12.45 PM.png

What I want to see in Canvas 7 is the ability for Mac users to resize the app window, switching between the iPhone view to the iPad view, and vice versa.

Mobile View (Apple and Google platforms only)

There needs to be an option to open the course content in the Canvas Mobile Apps.

Mobile View is not available for Windows 10 since Windows 10 Mobile support ended back to January 2020.

The following items are supported in Mobile View:

COURSE

  • Announcements
  • Assignments
  • Conferences
  • Discussions
  • Files
  • Grades
  • Modules
  • Pages
  • People
  • Quizzes
  • Syllabus

USER

  • Groups
  • Calendar
  • Conversations & Notifications
  • To-Do Lists
  • User Files

Mobile View in Global Navigation

Clicking the Mobile View button will pop up this dialog. If you are enrolled as a teacher, you can choose to open the content in the Canvas Teacher or Student app to see how the content will look like as a teacher or student, respectively.

(If you do not have the corresponding app downloaded, it will redirect you to the app store for the platform you are running (App Store for Apple platforms, Play Store for Google platforms).)

(This does not work correctly for Canvas Parent, as parents can only view assignments, course events, grades, and the front page for a student within that app, not other portions of Canvas.)

Open in Mobile View

Limitations

There are potential issues that need to be fixed as soon as possible to optimize the mobile experience for the Mac. Here are a few.

QR Code for Mobile Login does not work on the same device

Even though there is an option to log in to Canvas with a QR code (How do I view a QR code to log in to the Canvas mobile apps as an instructor?), this cannot be done on the same device.

This feature is designed to work on two devices at the same time: the desktop platform displaying the QR code, and the mobile platform scanning the code. In order to fix this issue, biometric technologies may need to be used (i.e., Touch ID and Face ID on the Mac; Pixel Imprint on the Chromebook).

(When enabling biometric login for a certain device, users must reenter their Canvas password for security reasons.)

Issues

FINGERPRINTS AND TOUCH ID
Will the same fingerprint work for additional Canvas institutions added through the list when Change User is selected? We don't want 5 fingerprints each representing a different institution, making things more complicated!
(Up to 5 fingerprints can be added on a single device with Touch ID.)

FACE ID
Things may get complicated with Face ID on Apple products including the iPhone X series, iPad Pro 3, and later devices. One scenario is that if your parent's or sibling's face looks just like yours and breaks in (Scenario 1)! Another scenario is when you can successfully authenticate when you are really young, but not when you grow up (Scenario 2). According to Apple, the statistical probability is different for twins and siblings that look just like you, and among children younger than 13 years old because their distinct facial features may not have developed fully, making them unnoticeable until they grow up.

Haibao

Scenario 1: Twin stuffed animals acting as siblings (younger one on the left). Assume that the registered face is that of the younger sibling. If they were real humans, will Face ID succeed on both of them, or will it only succeed on the younger sibling?

Age Progression

Scenario 2: Age progression of the same person (6th grade on the left, senior year on the right). Notice that her facial features are more noticeable as a young woman on the right.

Incompatibility with Intel-based Macs

As of right now, there are no Macs that run Apple Silicon processors. Doing a search for Canvas Instructure in the Mac App Store will not return any results. Apple Silicon is an ARM type of processor, and the first Apple Silicon Macs may arrive for consumers before the end of the Fall 2020 semester.

Canvas Mac App Store

Seriously? No Instructure desktop apps for the Mac?

Lack of touch screen support

When there are iOS apps running on a Mac with Apple Silicon, not having a touch screen can be a problem. What if a teacher needs to make annotations on images using the Apple Pencil when he/she forgot to bring in his/her iPad? Not having a touch screen hampers the process.

In the MacBook Pro series, there is already a touchpad and a Touch Bar. A touch screen would be excellent, bringing all the multi-touch gestures from iOS to the Mac. An Apple Pencil puts the icing on the cake.

352204_IMG_31041933DA18-1.jpeg

A teacher grades a random student with a caption and drawings from the iPhone.

Lack of augmented reality (AR) support

Even though AR support is available since Canvas 6.5, there is no rear-facing camera on MacBooks. There should be a MacBook Duo to resolve these issues.
(MacBook Duo is a fictional name for a 2-in-1 Apple Silicon MacBook that looks similar to the iPad Pro with a detachable touch screen and keyboard, but runs macOS instead of iOS. This has not been officially announced by Apple yet, at least until Q1-Q2 2021.)

352284_ar-button.png

Augmented reality files use the USDZ file extension.

SpeedGrader annotations gone wrong

Another issue is the orientation of SpeedGrader annotations. In the example below, both the image on the Mac and on the iPad are both in portrait mode without any problems. A teacher performed his grading on the iPad with Apple Pencil, and it was OK. The graded annotations were on the picture in portrait mode, as you can see in the image below. When going to the Mac to check it out, the annotations that he did on his iPad shows up in landscape mode, which is different from the image from the Mac.

352205_Screen Shot 2018-10-21 at 10.34.40 PM.png

The orientation of annotations on an image can be annoying. With five questions wrong in Part I and 12 wrong in Part II, what did the student really miss?

"I can't read this. Can someone help out?"

When we tested Canvas Mobile with Chromebooks on displays with very high resolutions (Pixel Slate), we found out that the font size is too small and unreadable on the default accessibility settings. Canvas Mobile on Mac really needs to address this accessibility issue ASAP.

Canvas Teacher view

The font size is too hard to read when using default accessibility settings for Android apps.

One font for all platforms

I've been a fan of typography ever since I got used to the December 2016 facelift of Canvas (Canvas Production Release Notes (2016-12-10) > Other Updates > User Updates > Global Font Update). The Lato font needs to be included in not just the web interface, but the mobile apps and the new community (New Community Almost Here) as well. This makes the experience consistent across all Canvas services.

Other Apps

There are two Canvas Apps that haven't been updated for a long time. Here's why they need to stay and not be delisted.

Polls (last updated 9/7/2017)

The Canvas Polls app is an easy way for you to request students' opinions in the classroom and collect responses with ease. They only need to download the Polls for Canvas app on their smartphone devices. A teacher uses his/her Mac as a hosting device, while his/her students use their smartphones as responding devices.

Share Results

Sample Polls screen showing a sample question from the hosting device. In this case, the correct life span of captive pandas is between 25-30 years (marked with a blue dot).

MagicMarker (last updated 5/19/2016)

The MagicMarker app is an efficient and effective way of recording the mastery of learning outcomes in the classroom. This syncs with the Learning Mastery Gradebook in Canvas (How does MagicMarker appear in the Learning Mastery Gradebook?). Tables created in MagicMarker are different than the groups you create in Canvas.

View Dashboard

The MagicMarker app syncs with the Learning Mastery Gradebook. You can separate your students into groups and even export the data.

Conclusion

I hope that the Canvas Mobile team gets its hands on the UQSP and DTK-2 soon! Believe me, when the new students arrive for the Spring 2021 semester and beyond, Canvas users can set up mobile apps for grading notifications, due date reminders, and vice versa. When TestFlight for Canvas 7 comes out, educators can demonstrate how Canvas Mobile on Silicon really works and what really needs to be tweaked. Remember, we don't want students to leave out negative course evaluations in the Mobility section (if listed).
(TestFlight invitations are limited up to 10,000 users, so be quick to join in once the TestFlight program starts!)

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Community Member

We usually talk about the risks of having your smartphone or tablet close when you are studying, since they are an inexhaustible source of interruptions and distractions. But these devices can also become your best allies if you use them properly. Would you like to know what are the best apps for students ? Keep reading because we have compiled the best Apps for students like you.


It is undeniable that the mobile, along with other devices, has become an inseparable companion in our day to day. We use it for countless things, perhaps making and receiving calls has become secondary. We use the mobile to communicate with friends and family, listen to music, exercise, practice meditation, etc. And for each of these functionalities we use an application. If you are a student, why not make the most of your mobile for this important part of your life?

The applications that we can use to study can help you take notes, organize your study time, save and organize documents, stay focused, learn languages, etc. And all these applications are in your app store (App Store or Google Play) with just one click. But since we know that the world of apps is an almost infinite universe, we have thought that it would be very helpful for you to know some of the best apps that you can use when studying.

1. Evernote

This application is one of the most powerful on the market to manage notes and take notes, since it allows you to capture information in different ways: written, web or screen captures, photos, voice notes, video, PDF, ... One of the things The most interesting features of this app is being able to combine documents of different types, such as making a handwritten annotation on a photo captured at the moment and another on file, or taking a web capture and adding an audio file, a document and a photo ... You can also attach documents from the Office package.

With Evernote you can organize all your documents and information, and you can access them from your computer, mobile or tablet, since it allows the synchronization of the application in real time with all your devices. In addition, it also allows you to work online with other users and synchronize shared files. Without a doubt, a very interesting application when taking notes and organizing all this documentation.

Evernote has a free version, which is limited, and a paid version. It is available on iOS, Android, MacOs and Windows.


2. One Note

The One Note application, from the Office 365 package, is another of the most notable when it comes to managing documents and taking notes. It allows you to type on the keyboard or by hand, as well as take voice notes, draw, cut out web elements. It is also possible to draw with it thanks to its flexible canvas, as well as digitizing the notes you have on paper.

Like Evernote, One Note allows text search in all those notes that you have taken by hand, as well as in the documents that you have scanned. This functionality is very useful when you have to search for a specific text or document.

One of the remarkable things about this application is the possibility of working online with other users, so that everyone can modify or complement the initial content. In addition, being the property of Microsoft, it allows you to work perfectly with the other applications of the Office package. It has a simple and modern interface. All this makes One Note one of the best apps for taking notes and organizing documentation. It is available on iOS, Android, MacOs and Windows.


3. Google documents

Google Docs, also known as Google Docs, is the word processor for Google's office suite. You will find this application installed by default in smarphones that have the Google operating system installed, as well as in chromeboks. In case you have an Iphone or iPad you can also install it. And of course, you can work with Google Documents from any browser.

We have chosen this application because you can always take it with you, regardless of the device you are working on, you will have access to all your documents, create new ones and modify existing ones.

Google Documents allows you to work without an internet connection, and the moment you reconnect it will update the changes you have made. All the documents you generate will be automatically saved in the Google cloud, so they will always be accessible and safe.

One of the characteristics that we like the most is the way in which it facilitates collaborative work, since you will be able to invite other users to work on certain documents, so that you can work simultaneously on a class assignment with the rest of your team members.

4. Google Calendar

Google Calendar is Google's calendar, and you can access it from your Google account. In this calendar you will be able to organize and plan your entire student life, from marking the days and times of your exams to planning and blocking time to study next week. Without a doubt, a calendar is an indispensable tool for the organization and planning of the study, and we think that the Google calendar is one of the best options.

In Google Calendar you can schedule your events, enter reminders and set your goals. The reminder works as an attached note that will appear at the time you schedule it and you can delete or postpone it once you see it. These reminders can be punctual or periodic. The objectives are set by you, and the app gives you different options on what you want to do. Once you set your goals you can choose the frequency with which you are interested in carrying out the activity and the application will find a place in your schedule so that you can carry them out. If what you want is to add an event, the app allows you to differentiate it with colors and add photographs, files or alarms for your events.

In the application you can configure different views (day, week or month) which will allow you to see at a glance the month's planning or see in more detail everything you have to do during a specific day. In addition, Google Calendar is synchronized with other Google applications, such as Gmail.

Like the other applications in the Google office suite, this application is free and available on iOS and Android, as well as on the web.

5. Todoist

Todoist is one of the best list and task management applications. You can easily enter all the tasks you have to do and classify them into folders to organize the scope of each task (studies, work, staff, etc.). You can also assign labels to the tasks to later filter them (for example, you can put the computer label for all those tasks in which a computer is necessary to perform them).

Like most to-do and task management apps, you can set deadlines and reminders for your tasks. In this way, if you have to deliver a job within a month, you can set the deadline for the delivery date and a reminder a few days before so that you do not forget.

Todoist allows collaborative work, that is, it allows you to share tasks with other people and thus manage teamwork more easily. In addition, this application has a gamification part that aims to boost your productivity, since the more tasks you complete, your "Karma" will increase.

Todoist has a free version and a premium version, which is paid. In addition, you can use this application on all platforms.

6. Be Focused

This app is based on the Pomodoro technique. With it you can plan the time you dedicate to each job and divide it into time intervals. It is a simple application that will allow you to stay focused and focused for a period of time.

Be Focused allows you to personalize the time you dedicate to each work interval, as well as the time dedicated to short and long breaks. In addition, you can visualize in a graph your progress to know how much time you have dedicated to each task. Simple and effective, basically a Pomodoro timer. Available for iOS.

7. Forest App

Forrest App is an application, based on the Pomodoro study technique, that will help you stay focused during your study sessions or work. We love this app because it adds a touch of gamification to avoid interruptions during periods of concentration.

How does the Forrest App work? It is very simple, you program a task and you start the clock. Right now you are planting the seed of your virtual tree. During the next 30 minutes your tree will grow, until it becomes a beautiful tree after 30 minutes of concentration. Every 30 minute period you will get a new tree until, little by little, you will get to have your own forest.

What happens if during your 30 minutes of concentration you leave the application and go to consult Instagram or answer a WhatsApp message? Well, your tree will die, and if you are a good person you will feel bad. It is a visual and enjoyable way to be clear about the time you have been able to stay focused and be productive. The best? You will be able to exchange your virtual trees for real ones and with your study time you will contribute to reforest endangered areas.

This application is available on all platforms.

Credits: Techshali/AndroidCure

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Adventurer

With so many institutions moving to online instruction during the pandemic, Canvas Mobile is due for a big update!

New Features

QR for Mobile Login (Available starting March 28 for students, April 4 for teachers and observers)

This feature appears in the Canvas Student 6.7 Release Notes and is now available in the Ready Release Notes (Ready Release Notes (2020-03-28) > Updated Features > User Navigation > Mobile App Login QR Code).

For teachers and observers, the QR code login will be available for the Teacher and Parent apps beginning April 4, 2020. Go to Ready Release Notes (2020-04-04) > User Navigation > Teacher/Observer Mobile App Login QR Code.

This is a feature that is most requested by Canvas users worldwide (https://community.canvaslms.com/ideas/14674-login-to-canvas-using-qr-code" modifiedtitle="true" titl...). You can finally login on your mobile device using the QR codes for mobile login. This can be done through the Canvas website and going to Account > QR for Mobile Login (as shown below) from the Global Navigation Bar.

QR code mobile login

QR for Mobile Login

QR for Mobile Login. This is already available in the beta environment and will be available in the production environment in the first two Ready Releases on March 28 for students and April 4 for teachers and observers.

Once you click on it, to log in to your Canvas account when you're on the go, just simply scan the QR code from the Canvas Mobile app (Change User > QR Login (below Find My School)). The code expires after 10 minutes, after which you will need to start the process over.

QR code example

Sample QR code. For security reasons, we had to wait 10 minutes before posting this so that the code is invalidated.

Native Conferences List

You can view any conferences made within Canvas from this section. Webviews are no longer used. Students can join in by tapping the green Join button.

WHAT ARE CANVAS CONFERENCES?
Canvas Conferences is a free service provided by BigBlueButton.
If your institution is likely to need more than 10 concurrent Conferences powered by BigBlueButton, we recommend upgrading to Premium BigBlueButton or exploring alternative conferencing solutions Canvas partners with, such as Zoom, Hangouts, Teams, and other video conferencing tools who are offering free or discounted services. Learn more.
Not all of these services may be supported by your institution. Please contact your local admin for more information.

Native Conferences

Sample conference. There is no Join button because the conference has not started.

Experimental Features

There are some experimental features in the iOS version of Canvas. Unless stated otherwise, experimental features are available in both the Student and Teacher apps.

(Those are view-only, just ignore them. Only our production team can control these features remotely.)


Experimental features

conferences (TEACHER ONLY)
Enable the native view for the Conferences in the Teacher app.

favorite_groups
You can view your favorite groups in the Groups tab.

simple_discussion_renderer
We don't know what this is, but it may render discussions faster in areas with low-bandwidth, hence the name Simple Discussion Renderer.

graphql_speed_grader
Enables the GraphQL data query engine for the SpeedGrader. Learn more.

refresh_tokens
Refresh access tokens.

new_page_details
???

notifications2
New options to mute course notifications (Mute Notifications by Course).

parent_inbox (TEACHER ONLY)
Allows teachers to receive Canvas messages from parents (Canvas Parent Release Notes (iOS 3.1)).

parent_calendar (TEACHER ONLY)
This is useful if parents want to notify their child's teacher about certain events, such as a doctor's appointment. This can come handy for teachers to mark absences as excused.

student_calendar (STUDENT ONLY)
It allows you to access your own calendar that is not part of any course.

testing
???

qr_code_login_enabled (STUDENT ONLY)
This refers to the QR for Mobile Login feature above, which will be enabled on March 28 for students and April 4 for teachers and observers.

Other Features

There is a more responsive layout, though we haven't tested it yet.

Want to learn more?

Please stay tuned to the Canvas Mobile Release Notes space (Release Notes: Mobile) over the next few days to get a broader look at these features. We hope you continue to excel!

And please tune in to the Zoom Meeting on the Canvas Mobile Q&A (Canvas Mobile Apps | Q&A) Wednesday at 2e/1c/11p!

Availability

Students

The Canvas Student 6.7 update is available for download through the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

Teachers & Observers

The Canvas Teacher and Parent app updates will be available starting on April 4.

Q&A

Will Conferences be in the Parent app?
Canvas Conferences are only available in the Student app for the time being.

Will LTI integrations (i.e., Pearson) work in mobile apps?
There is no LTI standard that works across mobile applications.

Are cloud assignments (3rd-party apps) supported?
Go here: How do I submit an assignment from a third-party app to the Student app on my iOS device?

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Essential Mobile Resources
How do I submit an assignment from a third-party app to the Student app on my iOS device?

SPECIAL THANKS
DeLaSalle High School
Jillian Patch
Mente Piccoli
University of Central Florida

Changelog

Minor changes are not shown.

DateChanges
2020-04-03Added QR code login for teachers and observers
2020-03-25Added info from Zoom meeting
2020-03-24Initial release

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Learner II

*You'll be glad you did.
 
In providing support for faculty and courses, certain best practices have been validated repeatedly. 
One of those is optimizing Canvas content pages to increase the likelihood your students will actually see and use them! 

Unpack Course Documents to Become Canvas Pages

When new instructors are transitioning to Canvas, the process can be overwhelming. An unfortunate, frequent shortcut is to simply “link” documents like the Syllabus or assignment instructions. This may appear to be a quick solution—but only for one semester. When the complexity of updating increases, the missed opportunity to apply best practices becomes apparent through extra hassles and files housekeeping over time. 

 
“A shortcut is the longest distance between two points”Charles Issawi
  •  
Bad reasons to Link documents in the RCE or Modules:
  • Seems faster.
  • Lower faculty skill-level or understanding of Canvas. Links to files are all the instructor knows how to do.
  • Instructor already has a big Masterfile with .pdfs and WordDocs that hasn’t been changed in years. 
  • Imaginary threats, like the fear that students will change the Syllabus and argue some detail with the instructor. 
  • Student UX hogwash! Courses have always been a big stack of papers to manage. Why suddenly make life easy for short attention spans?
  • Document was made on an old typewriter (or on MSWord) with lots of tabs and spaces to center the text. It will be a nightmare to learn the Word ribbon tool at this late date. 
 
Signs that .pdf/.doc overuse is an issue
  • The course files area has 6 old versions of the Syllabus from which to choose.
  • Course content is not updated because the instructor can’t locate their original doc for editing. 
  • Students don’t read the syllabus.
  • Instructors don’t understand why students don’t read the syllabus. See hint.

Hint: Students are looking on an iPhone and don’t want to clog up their memory by accidentally downloading that 10-page Syllabus yet again, plus the document opens in a tiny viewer in a 1 pt. font. Instead, use Canvas content pages to stream beautifully!

Upstream Management

Instead of waiting for increased difficulty all around, consider unpacking your .docs into Canvas as a best practice.
  • Accessibility
    • Transitions are an ideal time to use Headings/Styles, alt text, descriptive links, ribbon tools, and correct tables in the pages rich content editor (RCE). 
  • Encourage mobile streaming view for all content, versus documents to download and manage. 
    • Increases the likelihood of students being able to see and use the content on any device. 
  • Copyright
    • Transitions are an ideal time to check copyright, record your Fair Use justifications, and/or update content into safe compliance. 
  • Quicker updates each semester.
    • Compare updating a Syllabus in Canvas (Edit, type, save) with updating a linked document (Locate master doc, make changes, save, replace in Canvas, test to make sure you linked the correct doc, get rid of old doc, preserve link, etc.)
    • Remember, if you don’t do this every day, the workflow is forgettable.  Once a semester, and you’ll forget what you’re doing. 
  • Version control.
    No need to search for master copies on a former employee’s home computer. Everything related to the course lives in the Canvas course. 

340448_documents-158461.png

 

Process

  • .Docs that are already Accessible easily become Canvas content pages that are accessible, with a simple copy and paste.

    • The transfer process reveals old-school tabs and spaces misuse. Oops.  Those must be manually corrected once the content is in Canvas RCE.

  • .pdfs can be a nightmare. Depending on the complexity of content, you may need to open a .pdf in Adobe Acrobat Pro and export it as a WordDoc, then scan carefully for substitutions, misspellings, and other transcription errors. 

 

Exceptions

Course builders work with what we have. Sometimes you just let one thing go—temporarily—to meet a deadline or inch toward progress. 
 
*Good Reasons to link a document in RCE or modules
  • Students need to download and print an entire document intact. Example: APA or MLA formatted example research paper.
  • Information is not likely to change and is not available another way. Example: an archived out-of-print article. 
  • Information that is already accessibility checked. Example: Government website downloads or official releases.

Ready or Not

Ready or not, increasing numbers of students view Canvas courses on mobile devices. (Numbers may vary by institutions, but the overall trend is upward for mobile use.)
 
Even if your course is designed for desktop/laptop, a quick check on iOS and Android devices will give you a more complete idea of what students see—and why they interact with the course the way they do. 
 

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Instructure
Instructure

We’re at nine million monthly active users of the Canvas mobile apps, which is many millions more than when I last posted about Instructure’s approach to mobile. If you’re new to Canvas, or if you’re curious about how and why we do the things we do, this post is for you!

We anchor mobile app development to a few principles:

  1. Focus on experience. There’s a lot of ground to cover when it comes to making Canvas fit into your pocket. The mobile apps have to be secure and accessible and scalable. They have to be translated into 34 languages. The mobile apps have to evolve with regular changes to Canvas web and mobile operating systems. They have to handle courses with 10 students where every assignment is an LTI launch, and they have to handle courses with 200 students where every assignment is a discussion. The iOS and Android apps have to look and function the same way despite being on two different tech stacks produced by two different teams of people. But just as importantly, the mobile apps have to deliver worthwhile experiences. If regular operations take too long or make you miserable, or if the interface just looks like bad, you might as well be using any other LMS. Canvas has to be better.

    Here's a subset of the 82 polish items to address before releasing Canvas Parent 3.1, for example:

    parent_polish_items

    These polish tickets are usually cosmetic, and they come when we compare iOS and Android side-by-side at the end of developing a feature.

  2. Ship things. Product development exists on a spectrum. On one end, you plan every detail and you never take risks and as a result, you never ship things because you find that details change and risks can’t be avoided. On the other end of the spectrum, you don’t plan enough and you ship quickly and you break things. The outcomes at either end of the spectrum aren’t good. The Canvas mobile teams strive to be somewhere in the middle of that spectrum, always erring on the side of shipping. We can’t deliver the value that we don’t ship. We believe that when we mess up, we ought to listen and learn and ship again.

  3. People over process. In my experience, this is the most overlooked value from the agile manifesto -- which is roughly the constitution of agile software development. Our teams do their best to reconcile what’s planned and what’s right when there’s a gap. We try to keep enough perspective to prevent process from lulling us into doing stupid things. There are scenarios where this principle doesn’t work, but we try to create situations where it does (small teams, smart people, taking on new challenges, limiting recurring meetings, encouraging communication, etc.).

    Here's one of my favorite parts about working at Instructure:

    allen_slack
    This is the mobile support lead's way of saying something is on fire somewherecheck it out. I've worked for companies where people roll their eyes when they see this and say they'll get to it next sprint. That's the worst, and it's what you get with process over people. If there's a fire, we're going to stop regularly scheduled programming to go deal with it.

  4. Prioritize real-life benefits. When you’re planning a project on a platform as versatile as Canvas, it’s tempting to miss the forest for the trees. What happens with our new feature if this course setting is on and this feature flag is off and this sub-account hides this button and this root account has this permission disabled for this role and this ticket hasn’t merged to beta? Concerns like these take up a huge amount of mental space, and to a large extent, it’s the job of product and engineering teams to make sure these cases are hashed out. At some point, it’s also true that 99.723% (see: made-up numbers) of users won’t experience the case you’re worried about, and you’re better off figuring out how to remove extra bits of friction for the average user. This is not a straightforward thing to balance, but in general, the mobile teams will prioritize delivering maximum value to maximum people over checking every last feature box.

  5. Throw a little weird in there. Our software is designed and built by people as quirky as our users, and it ought to reflect that fact for the sake of everyone involved. If you like your software a little more dry and dusty, I’ve had good luck recently with printer utilities, insurance apps, and SimCity 2000 doesn’t hold up quite as well as I expected. Weirdness is especially vulnerable to atrophy over time, but it’s worth protecting. We want to flex those weird muscles.

When you mix those principles together, you get role-based apps which are updated regularly and rated best-in-class by users -- with spinning Canvas logos and panda avatar builders to top it off!

This definitely doesn't mean everything is awesome. Our approach involves tradeoffs. Let’s use peer reviews as an example. It’s a cool feature, and some people rely on peer reviews, and you can’t conduct peer reviews from our mobile apps today. We consider peer reviews every time we touch assignments in mobile. We have a design, and we know how it would work, and we know what it would take to support it. The problem is that peer reviewing is a relatively lesser used feature of assignments, and it would take a lot of effort to support natively. Instead of working on peer reviews last fall, we focused on things like improving load times on grade lists in student and teacher apps, and increasing the visibility of feedback on submissions, and reducing taps to submit assignments. But if you created those peer review assignments, this is still a bummer, and I get it!

I can think of a few escapes for this predicament, in no particular order:

  • If you’re on a tablet or Chromebook, Canvas web is fully supported in your native web browser
  • Some schools contract with our professional services team for custom development
  • Our mobile apps are open source, and some schools build their own mobile apps using our repositories as a model
  • You could build the feature yourself and submit a pull request for our mobile team to review
  • We can hop on a call and you can argue that we’re doing it wrong
  • You can submit a feature idea in our community and see how it resonates with other Canvas users


If you want to know more about web/mobile parity, our documentation team has created some guides for the student and teacher apps that you may find helpful. If you have feedback on making those documents better, send it on!

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Working as an EdTech Specialist at a renowned Med School I come across various scenarios.

Major Users: Students, Instructors and Canvas Admins (Including Me! :smileygrin:)

How and Why:

  • Majority of our students use Canvas iOS app to take notes on their iPads. We have 50+ courses in MD Program and Canvas app is very helpful as it eases the stress of downloading a lot of paper or notes and bring it to the class. Instead use the canvas app on the iPads and write notes on PPTs or PDF's which are linked in their courses. 
  • Other places where Mobile App comes in to picture is when our 3rd Year MD students are in clinics and have no time to login to Desktop. All that they do is use their apps and look at their schedules during their hectic Clerkship Courses. Students find the process of synching calendars easy and are happy about it.
  • Note taking is easy, stress free and students need not carry tons of paper or books to sessions or classes.

What they like: Announcements, Calendar Events, Grades, To-Do items, Assignments and Files

***I use the Canvas App on Various devices to troubleshoot and test out any new features which can be useful for our students and faculty***

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Instructure
Instructure

We’re waffling between snow and sunshine in Utah and my discolored pumpkins are shriveled and leaking, so that means it’s time for a fall update! Here’s what the mobile teams are working on.

Rise of the Machines

After a couple of relatively smooth iOS update cycles over the past two years, iOS 13 landed like Jello in a mud puddle. Its release coincided with a few big changes shipped as Canvas Student 6.6 and run-of-the-mill fall start firefighting. This combination resulted our patching the iOS student app every two weeks since August. While most of our users weren’t impacted by most of the bugs that were fixed, we didn’t hold onto fixes any longer than necessary. Now that the fall start rush has subsided, we’ve decided to redouble our efforts to automate testing in our mobile apps.

We’ve made more progress on automated testing in the past six months than in the previous three years combined, but we expect the robots to do more -- and to do it faster -- so that humans can focus on creating cool new things instead of shipping patches for defects that robots would have caught.

To illustrate the point, here’s a gif of an automated test of quiz-taking in the Android student app, first through the quizzes list and then through the assignments list:

quizzes end-to-end test

So that’s much faster than a human doing the same thing.

The up-front cost is high: it takes longer for a person to write the test above than it does for a person to test that flow. But once the test is written, it can be run as often as necessary. When you consider that the student app test suite is comprised of hundreds of tests, being able to run all of those tests in minutes instead of weeks is a substantial improvement.

The iOS and Android teams are both committed to writing and running all P0 and P1 [highest priority] tests by the end of this year. The good news is the automated test runs are already catching defects! A test run failed earlier this week when “Stop Acting As User” resulted in the robot admin being logged out altogether, for example.

The bad news is the increased focus on automation slows down our progress on parent app feature improvements. But I think it will be worth the wait.

Canvas Parent 3.0

In case you didn’t see the previous mobile update, we’re dividing parent app work into three chunks: grades list and syllabus (3.0), messaging (3.1), and calendar (3.2).

We’re in the process of testing one API change scheduled to go to production this week to finish up work on iOS Canvas Parent 3.0. I think we’ll be able to provide a link to the TestFlight version of that update by the end of this week. Apple allows public TestFlight links now, so no need to register beforehand anymore! 

I’ll provide a little more detail when I post the link, but at a high level, you’re going to see a grades list in the parent app for the first time, more robust homepage support (syllabus and frontpage will both be supported), and links from each of those places will work. Here's what that looks like:

course home in 3.0

This replaces the old "week" view within a course, which was redundant within the parent app.

If the TestFlight version looks good, we plan to ship it to the App Store in December.

For a variety of reasons -- some of which have to do with automated testing -- the current plan is for Android to bundle all three parent app chunks into a single update, which we’ll call 3.2. I’ll post a public link to that work-in-progress within a few weeks. We’re predicting that both platforms will ship 3.2 at about the same time in the new year.

Keep your eyes peeled for a separate post with more details soon!

------------

Since this post was relatively light on visuals, I took a picture of my desk neighbor and Android QA lead, "Just-Try-And-Stop-Me" Joe, working on automated tests for the student app:

 

smart joe

Happy November to you too, Joe! Do it to it!

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Adventurer

Since the release of the New Quizzes platform in June 2018, there have been many advances. Here are some things that you should know about New Quizzes on Canvas Mobile.

CREATING A NEW QUIZ

In order to create a New Quiz, you must do so from the desktop. You cannot do it from the Canvas Teacher app since there is no Add Assignment button on the bottom right corner of the screen.

From Assignments, we will create a new assignment. We will not use the Add Quiz/Test button due to the lack of certain fields.

Assignments page

Now that we've got the Instructions and Content Selector Sidebars, we can go ahead and fill in some details.

Add Assignment

For this assignment, please use the Quizzes 2 LTI External Tool.

Quizzes 2 LTI

Once we save and publish, it will be visible in the Mobile Apps. The pencil icon on the top right will be the only way for you to edit the quiz instructions from the Assignments page. To add/remove questions, select the External Tool under Submission Types.

Canvas Teacher view

Once the student finishes the test, the results will be displayed.

Results

Wait a second! Something's not looking right when there are fractions.

Fraction error_

Students can leave comments to request regrades. The teacher can then open the Mobile SpeedGrader and see the problematic question.

RULES FOR REGRADING

Regrading only applies to completed submissions. If all students are affected, please wait for all submissions before regrading.

Since the correct answer is a fraction, manual grading may be needed. To avoid any issues from occurring in the future, please recommend students to round decimals to the required precision, up to the thousandths.

Manually adjusting grade

And that's it! You can now master the power of New Quizzes in the Canvas Mobile Apps!

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Adventurer

I am not normally an end of the line type person when getting on the bus, usually, I am towards the front 10% of the line. I feel like I have almost missed the Mobile App bus. I don't have an excuse for why it has taken so long for mobile apps to grab my attention, but now that it has, I'm glad I waited.

Recently I've been researching all of the resources available about Canvas' mobile apps. Our college adopted Canvas in early 2015. I have been aware of the apps since the beginning. At the time we adopted Canvas, the apps did not seem to work as well as the website. I've recently discovered, now that some time has passed, Canvas has made quite a few improvements in their apps.

I know that an increasingly larger percentage of students at our college use their mobile devices to access their courses. I don't have any idea how many of those might be using the app, but I feel like it would be a larger number if we were promoting the use of the app to our students and instructors.

After reviewing all of the information in the @Canvas Mobile App Group (#CMAG) I have discovered that a) the Canvas Student App has many features that allow students to interact easier than when they are using a browser to access their course, and b) I have not been providing information and promoting the use of the Canvas Student App as I should be.

So my next steps, now that I have been enlightened, is to begin introducing and promoting the use of the App to our students and instructors. I am excited to begin this marketing of the App. Anything that makes navigating the course and learning easier for students is a priority for our college. I know that there is a lot to learn, but I am thankful for all of the authors that have contributed the information in this community. 

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Instructure
Instructure

Hope summer is going well for you! After the second-rainiest spring on record, the atmosphere over Utah burned away and now we're all walking around in climate-controlled space suits and eating sand.

Here’s what the mobile teams are working on.

Canvas Student

New assignment details and submission flows are coming in Canvas Student 6.6! We showed off this update at InstructureCon two weeks ago, but in case you missed it, here’s what that looks like:

assignment details in canvas student 6.6

The student app assignment detail view is the most-used detail view across all of our apps, and we’re really excited about this upgrade going into the new school year. We improved assignment details in a few ways:

Grade visibility. Most students access the assignment detail view to check a grade (surprise!), so we needed the design to reflect that pattern.

Feedback visibility. Grades are just the tip of the feedback iceberg. Almost all the value for the student -- and the bulk of time spent grading -- is in the comments. We wanted to beef up the visibility of teacher feedback (off the top of my head: annotations, annotation comments, submission comments, media comments, rubrics, and rubric comments). The student can now find all feedback in a single place while also viewing and interacting with their submission. And for the first time, students can navigate all rubric details -- all scores, definitions and descriptions -- both before and after submission.

Submission flow. If you’ve never submitted a file to Canvas from another app on a mobile device then you haven’t felt confusion. You may have heard about it, but you haven’t felt it in your bones. That’s a problem because students increasingly rely on the mobile app to submit assignments. Well, problem solved in 6.6. Here’s the new share extension in action -- submitting from the Files app on iOS to Canvas:

share extension in canvas student 6.6

Submitting from within the app is also much better -- with the one exception of cloud assignments: those remain unchanged. To ship this update before fall start we had to save improvements to cloud assignments for another day. To play with new submissions yourself, see the TestFlight link below.

Lastly -- unrelated to assignment details -- hold onto your wigs and keys if you use Canvas Student on iPad because here’s the thing you’ve been waiting for:

side-by-side on ipad in canvas student 6.6

That’s right, support for split view is coming in 6.6!

We’re in the process of testing 6.6 for both platforms right now. The iOS team is on track to begin rollout in the first week of August, and the Android update will happen a few days afterwards. If you want to help us test the 6.6 update by playing with it on iOS through TestFlight, here’s a link:

Join the Canvas Student beta - TestFlight - Apple 

As usual, if you find any funny business, feel free to report it below. (...unless the 6.6 update is already released to stores when you're reading this. Once a release hits stores, you're better off reporting any issue you find to Canvas Support.)

Canvas Teacher

Over the past few weeks we’ve worked on improving load times for submissions in the teacher app. If you work in large courses -- on the order of hundreds of enrollments -- stay tuned for the next teacher app release on iOS and Android. It should hit stores within the next few weeks. Everyone will see improved load times but it will be most noticeable for large courses.

Next up for the teacher app is adding support for post policies, which are the new gradebook’s equivalent of the old gradebook’s muting/unmuting grades.

Canvas Parent

We’ve already released two updates that should really help the observer self-registration process for teachers and parents this fall. If your school/system uses self-registration for parents, take note and help spread the word:

[INSERT LASER-LIKE FOCUS HERE]

  1. Teachers can now create pairing codes for an entire class with a single click. Check out the documentation on exporting pairing codes to see how.
  2. Parents can now add additional students to observe from the parent app. Android added this feature a little while ago, and iOS supports it as of this week. Canvas guides are being updated right now with directions for parents, and I'll update this post with the links when they're live.
    Update: Check out the iOS and Android guides for adding students to observe from the parent app.

[END FOCUS]

I’m super excited to have these updates live before fall start, and I hope you are too! They should really smooth out the parent onboarding process.

Now for the fun part: improving the in-app experience for parents! Our goal is to help parents support their students on a daily basis by answering some simple questions: How’s my kid doing, and what’s due and when? We have three updates planned to answer those questions in a better way, divided as follows.

3.0: New grades list and updated syllabus. Today, parents can only view grades in the week view, which means there’s no way to see a summary of assignment grades in a particular course. In the 3.0 update, parents will have access to the same grades list that students have today (including grading period filter). In addition, we’ll make access to the course syllabus more obvious and add support for linking from rich content.

3.1: Messaging. The parent app is getting an inbox! Parents will be able to send and receive messages from the app, and message composition will be contextual. Parents will be able to compose a message from the assignment detail view, for example, and we’ll add the appropriate teacher(s) as recipients automatically. We’ll also include a link to the content being referenced in the text of the message so teachers have a little more context on the receiving end. (Yes, the parent app will use the existing Canvas Inbox to make this happen.)

3.2: New calendar. The parent app’s calendar isn’t awesome. We’re going to be redesigning it to include more course content like announcements and to-do items, which don’t show up in today's parent app. Parents should also be able to filter the calendar by course and content type, and see busy days upcoming for their students at a glance. (Then we plan to reuse the new calendar for the student app.)

These updates will be built and released throughout the fall. I’ll post progress updates, designs and links to beta builds in CMUG in the coming weeks.

-------------------------------

Happy fall start to everyone! If you experience any issues, report them! We're here to help!

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Welcome Page

Designers can spend hours on creating the perfect home page for a course, setting everything up just how they like it, then guess what, the student viewing it is using the app. How does that home page look on the app, chances are it scaled differently, or something moved. 

Creating a solid template and then adjusting the template to the needs of the course is a great way to make sure your homepage looks sharp across all devices, because when you find out students are primarily using their phones, you better engage them the same way as you would on the desktop.

 

Here are a couple of  mobile friendly CanvasLMS homepage templates I finished up.

Feel free to download in the Canvas Commons:

Welcome Page | Purple & Yellow color scheme: https://lnkd.in/gmWUaHG

Welcome Page | Red & Blue color scheme: https://lnkd.in/gba4FtD

Many more to follow Smiley Happy

instructional_designer‌ instructional designers higher ed instructional design 

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Instructure
Instructure

Here's some stuff that's worth writing home about!

Canvas Student:

We’ve been working for months on a new assignment details page and a new submission workflow for students in mobile. I outlined some of the features of that project in a post last fall. To minimize the risk of disruption, we don’t plan to release the update in stores until summer, but we will provide a link to a beta version of this update as it nears completion.

Cloud assignments have been harder to make good than we originally thought they would be, but we aren’t giving up yet. Everything else is going swimmingly. This is going to be an awesome update. Right now, it’s slated as Canvas Student 6.6 – more to come soon.

We will have a smaller feature release – Canvas Student 6.5 – likely before the end of the school year. That’s going to contain a syllabus update for both platforms. The old (current) syllabus works like this:

311217_old_syllabus.gif

That’s...one way to present a syllabus. But probably not the best way. If you use the syllabus as your course homepage, you probably create attractive and/or important content to be featured on the syllabus, which today gets hidden behind a “Syllabus” button when the student has already tapped to view the syllabus. The old design is also inconsistent with the way the syllabus is presented on the web: rich content more prominent, and list of assignments less prominent.

The new syllabus looks like this:

 311218_new_syllabus.gif

So that’s better.

The 6.5 update will also include some cool iOS-specific features: support for viewing augmented reality files, checking grades via Siri Shortcuts, and updated Apple Pencil support.

Canvas Teacher:

 

We’re almost done with the most-requested feature for the teacher app, which is adding support for modules. Starting with Canvas Teacher 1.8, you’ll be able to navigate your course via modules list, like this:

311231_new_modules.gif 

Editing the module progression is significantly more complex because of features like mastery paths and module item prerequisites, and it also seems like a task more aligned with course creation rather than course facilitation, so that won’t be included in this release. Instead, if you like navigating your course via modules, you can do that!

This update also improves our use of temporary file storage so the teacher app stops eating all the goshdarn space on your iPad.

If you want to try out modules in Canvas Teacher 1.8 (iOS-only at the moment, Android is still in progress), use this link from your iPhone/iPad: https://testflight.apple.com/join/XzMfiwYM

If you see anything wonky, wobbly or just straight up whack, please reply to this post so we can fix it.

Canvas Parent:

I’m on a mission to make the parent mobile experience good. Less like Twinkies good, more like Plato’s Form of the Good. That means two things for the app most urgently:

  • Improve the process of connecting parents and students and teachers and Canvas. We started this last summer by unifying the parent user/Canvas user paradigm, which was 100% necessary and fundamental for kicking things up another notch, but now we need to actually kick things up another notch: allow teachers to mass produce pairing codes, allow students to create pairing/QR codes from mobile, allow parents to connect with multiple students from the parent app…that kind of thing.
  • Provide parents with more/better information. They access Canvas because they’re trying to help their kids. That could require viewing course announcements, school announcements, course content, calendar, assignment grades, communication with teachers, maybe even content recommendations to help them understand the topics their kids are learning.

We’re in a position to help parents support their students, and to reduce stress for admins and teachers in dealing with parents, and most importantly, to accomplish these things in a way that actually helps kids (instead of creating more noise or adding unnecessary burden). I’ll provide more specifics on upcoming parent app development soon, but if you feel passionately about this, I’d love to pick your brain and steal your ideas! The best way to arrange this is probably through your CSM.

That's all for now! 

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Community Coach
Community Coach

It's been a slow developing love affair Canvas Apps.

Knowing people LOVE your company and just want to have you around. 

Getting to know you myself - just holding hands and becoming familiar with what makes you tick. 

Now I find it hard to get by for a day without you. 

Knowing you are there for me, day or night. My wish is your command. 

Seriously folks, it has taken me a while to get to know some of the magic in the Canvas Apps. I think we still need to get to know each other a little more but the love is growing. 

My favourite is the immediacy of Announcements. I'd love to know what other people's favourite aspects are. 

 309291_smile.jpg

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Instructure
Instructure

It’s about time we published an update from the Canvas mobile teams, don’t you think?

Here are some fall start highlights -- in descending order of how much they excited me:

  • Neighbor’s kid stopped me taking out the trash and said the student app’s gotten soooooo much better since he started using it last year!
  • Canvas Student hit 3 million daily active users a couple of weeks ago!
  • iOS 12 and Android Pie updates broke fewer things than usual!
  • Canvas Teacher became the highest-rated LMS teacher app on iOS and Android!
  • Canvas Student became the highest-rated LMS student app on iOS and Android!

Not everything went perfectly. Including both platforms, we closed 50 functional bugs in the month of September, and several more accessibility bugs. The self-registration pairing code rollout for parent app required a couple tweaks. But overall, it was a relatively smooth start for the mobile teams.

Both platforms are in the process of releasing Student 6.4 (adding support for custom help and searching files) and Teacher 1.7 (respecting document orientation set by DocViewer and adding an annotation eraser).

Now we’re on to Student 6.5, which will bring with it a new assignment details page and submission flow. The assignment details page is the most-visited details page in the student app. It’s also one of the oldest, and the current design doesn’t make much sense given how students use it.

For example, we know students look for their grade when they open an assignment after submission, but right now that information is hidden in a separate tab. We know students want information about submission status, but right now that doesn’t appear in the assignment details view. We know teachers want students to see comments and feedback, but right now there's no indication that feedback is available. We plan to fix all of that.

In addition, we think we can significantly improve the experience of submitting an assignment through mobile. Today’s submission flow feels awkward and laborious, and our analytics say that only about half the people that start submitting through mobile actually finish submitting through mobile. With an increasing number of students completing assignments solely from mobile devices, we have an opportunity to reduce some points of regular friction. That includes adding proper support for Canvas cloud assignments.

Today, opening a Google or Office assignment from the mobile app takes approximately 147 taps too many, and that’s because we launch the assignment as an LTI tool in a webview rather than attempting to open the Google or Office native apps. In the future, when a student taps “Launch External Tool” on a cloud assignment, we plan to redirect to the Google or Office apps directly. Combine that with a more streamlined process for submitting to Canvas from third-party apps, and submission flows in the student app all around should be much improved with the 6.5 release.

Let’s see some pictures!

New assignment details -- notice the submission status, the large grade cell, the “Feedback” pill indicating submission comments or annotations, and the large “Submit” or “Resubmit” button:

new_assignment_details

New submission details -- notice the student’s view of their submission is only a single tap away from the assignment details, the similarity to the teacher app SpeedGrader view, and the ability to view the submission, rubric and feedback in a single place:

294058_Submission.png

New app extension -- students can submit a file directly to Canvas from a third-party app:

app_extension

The iOS and Android teams are both working on new assignment details and submission flows now, and we hope to release it sometime in Q1 of 2019. We’re super excited about these upgrades.

If you’ve got a pet peeve with assignments in mobile that you feel like I haven’t addressed here, or if you want to give any other feedback, feel free to post a comment!

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Surveyor

Confession: my initial reason for writing this blog is that it's part of a quest (called "Mobilize your assignments"), or at least that's where it stems from. I do enjoy the quests - they're a great way of learning and I'm a sucker for some gamification. Anyway. I'm always scouring the community to solve one problem or another, and the more I think about it, this is a big one.

Moving to Canvas was pretty liberating for many of our teachers - the simple page editor offers so much functionality to create content exactly how you want it to appear to students, and with no HTML knowledge required! And there's a mobile app for students too, you say? Well great - they can see my awesome course page designs in an even nicer way on their phones, right!? If you're reading this, I suspect you already know that this is unfortunately not the case...

So, here are some very simple lessons learned:

Using tables just to structure content in a page is a no-no. It may seem an easy way to achieve the look you're after, and it may look perfect on your screen when you build it, but trust me - it won't be so in the mobile app! So now you've got a decision to make:

  1. You should simplify your design, and let go of that dream of placing content exactly where you want it to appear on the screen. Simple linear (i.e top to down) presentation of content can work just fine
  2. If that's just not acceptable then you've got some learning to do about two things - divs and flexbox classes. Accept that you're journeying into coding, but don't worry that you're 'not a coder so this is not an option'. You'll learn these things (and probably more) by copying other people's code, changing it, breaking it, fixing it, and just doing that experiential learning thing!

I'll point you towards one great community question to get you on your way - it features many useful responses and further links from savvy members of the community: Anchor a Div

I'm sure there are even more posts out there in the community at time of writing (and that will come into existence beyond) - please post links below if you know of any particularly good ones for the sake of future readers Smiley Happy

P.S it goes without saying that whatever device you're designing for, always make it accessible (use the accessibility checker, alt-tags for images/headers for tables where required, use format text styles and ordered lists where appropriate, check your colour contrast ratios... and I've very likely forgotten more important ones so again, add below!)

P.P.S shout out to debra.mansperger@mesacc.edu for asking the question in that original post above and inspiring me to write this short blog on this topic 

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Explorer III

Oregon State surveyed over 2,000 of their ecampus students about their device preferences and were surprised with some of the results (according to a Webinar I attended that was hosted by the researchers Mary Ellen Dello Stritto, Ph.D. and Katie Linder, Ph.D.). Students don't always prefer mobile as many assume (including me Smiley Happy). 

Their research report Student Device Preferences for  Course Access and Multimedia Learning

includes all the survey questions and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

An interesting paragraph from their conclusion (Stritto & Linder, 2018, p. 23): "The results of this study show a wide range and variety of usage of the four main device types: desktops, laptops, tablets, and smartphones. However, the students in this study overwhelmingly owned laptops and preferred to use those devices to access their courses and engage with videos and other multimedia. While this study showed that some students were using tablets and smartphones to access their course materials, they were rarely preferred, although they were used for convenience."

Of course, various colleges and universities obtain different results when they survey students using questions that are worded differently and are directed at different student demographics. On p. 29, the demographics describe how three quarters of their respondents were undergraduates with an average GPA of 3.39. Also, 42.9% were seniors and 23.9% were engineering students. The table on p. 27 lists respondent race/ethnicity that is not as diverse as other universities, such as Wayne State University in my home town of Detroit, Mic... and not as diverse as our community college in the Metro Detroit suburbs. Maybe various colleges and universities will administer the exact same student device preferences survey Stritto & Linder (2018) provided within their report. If so, I hope everyone shares out their results! 

Dello Stritto, M. E. & Linder, K. E. (2018). Student device preferences for  course access and multimedia learning. Corvallis, OR. Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit.

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4 1 320
Instructure
Instructure

If you're looking for printer-friendly how-to guides for parents who are self-registering for Canvas, here's what we've come up with:

To modify these for your school or classroom, go to `File -> Make a copy...` and edit to your heart's content!

For an easy read on what's new in Canvas Parent 2.0 that also features links to Canvas Guides, view the Canvas Parent 2.0 What's New PDF.

That PDF is also presented from the parent app in version 2.0 if a person taps "See what's new" from the launch page.

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7 5 5,047
Instructure
Instructure

Instructure's mobile strategy usually ends up outlined in a couple of InstructureCon presentations, but if you’re new to Canvas, or if you haven’t made it to InstructureCon, or if you just want to know more about our mobile strategy, here’s a brief summary.

We build native mobile apps because native mobile offers a much better experience than mobile web from mobile devices. This means we minimize the number of web views in our mobile apps, and instead rely heavily on the Canvas API to present information from Canvas in a way that’s optimized for touchscreens, big and small. There are a few learning management systems that treat their mobile apps like web portals and their mobile experiences generally stink as a result, but many lean native nowadays for that reason. If you’ve ever annotated a paper from a mobile web browser and then done the same thing from a native app (say, Canvas Teacher), you can easily feel the difference in experience.

A few years ago we decided that we could further refine our mobile experience by focusing on how people approached Canvas from mobile devices. We noted a few truths up front:

Canvas_is_big_Devices_are_small_People_are_different

In other words, Canvas is roughly bigger than the Pyramids of Giza combined, and even a gargantuan phone like the Samsung Galaxy Note is relatively small, and we have the opportunity to bridge that gap by giving people the experience they need from mobile -- tailored to their role -- because their expectations depend on their role.

A student approaches Canvas saying I want to see my grade on this assignment, or I want to see what’s due next week. A teacher approaches Canvas saying I want to post an announcement, or I want to grade this assignment. A parent approaches Canvas saying What’s Canvas? So let's deliver experiences that map to those realities.

This approach is working so far on a number of fronts:

  1. The apps are easier to use because they provide the functions you need rather than the ones you don’t.
  2. It streamlines messaging for us and for our clients. Parents don’t need to learn how to use Canvas, for example, they just need to learn how to use the parent app.
  3. It forces us to decompose problems from the perspective of the user. Rather than let’s build an assignments page for a 4-inch screen, we say students need to submit assignments, or teachers need to grade assignments, and those needs inform how the assignments page needs to look and function from a variety of perspectives.
  4. The apps are easier to maintain because we narrow the set of perspectives to consider for any function within a given app.

For an example that illustrates how roles inform the Canvas mobile experience, here’s the teacher app assignment details page beside the upcoming student app assignment details page:

Assignments_in_Canvas_Teacher_compared_to_Canvas_Student

Teachers see submission dials -- students see information about their own submissions. Teachers see publishing status -- students see submission status. Teachers can modify assignment details and grade submissions -- students can submit (or resubmit) assignments. Especially with limited screen real estate, we want to give people the experience they need to efficiently get things done no matter who or where they are.

We continue to release app updates geared towards boosting productivity and efficiency as quickly as we can build them, which is relatively quickly. Of course, Canvas offers support for tablet browsers, and new features -- like our new quizzes platform -- are built to be fully responsive if you're really jonesing for browser access from a mobile device. But we think if mobile is worth doing, it's worth doing right. With an ever-increasing number of daily active users in our native mobile apps, we're confident that we're on the right path.

Lastly, we make it a point to learn our way forward, so your feedback is incredibly important to the success and usefulness of our apps. If you're passionate about a idea related to mobile, we want to hear from you. Real bad. You can reach out to us through the community or email or client services. We'd love to chat.

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15 0 573
Learner II

The Information School, iSchool, at the University of Washington has been providing templates for our Canvas courses since about late 2012. We started using Canvas in fall of 2011. Our templates have evolved with the available technological advances and we have spent the last few months designing for the next iteration. One of my colleagues, putrih‌, has spent a great deal of time working on this new generation of templates.

Part of the design process was to do a detailed usability study with a number of our students from the various programs that we offer at the iSchool. We offered gift cards to the participants and then sat with them as they worked their way through two different versions of the next gen templates. By far, they preferred our "compact" design for the less complex courses. This design uses collapsible sections that work pretty well in most browsers both on the desktop and on mobile. Unfortunately, we haven't been able to get the javascript right so the collapsible sections work on the apps. We are working with kenneth.larsen@usu.edu‌ from Cidi Design Tools to help us figure out what is happening in the apps. Yes, Design Tools was used heavily throughout the coding process and really simplified the task in many ways.

The question that we always struggle with is whether to optimize our templates for responsiveness or make them work best in the app. There are pros and cons either way but we are currently leaning more to the responsive design that works in the mobile browsers. For what our students do on mobile, based on a survey from a year ago, I think our focus on responsive is better at this point. What are your thoughts about developing for the apps, mobile web or both?

So, let's take a look at our "compact" template on both the Desktop and Mobile:

280486_pastedImage_1.jpg

The image above show the desktop version of the template on the left and the mobile version on the right. The desktop version is shown in the Chrome browser and the mobile version is from Chrome on an Android device running Android 5.1 Nearly identical other than the purple menu wrapping and the course stream link loading at the bottom on mobile.

The next image shows "Week 1" expanded on both platforms, desktop on the left and mobile on the right:

280487_pastedImage_2.jpg

You can see that the 3 column layout on the desktop collapses really well to a single column on the mobile side.

The next image show the comparison between the two platforms showing the menu on the syllabus page:

280488_pastedImage_3.jpg

The last thing I will share is a two minute screencast of this template being used on my phone. It works really well.

I hope people find this post useful 🙂

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10 7 2,088
Community Coach
Community Coach

At UCF we have been using Canvas campus-wide since 2013. When we started using Canvas, there wasn't much mobile available. The SpeedGrader app had been out for a year or so, the iOS app was very limited, and the Android app just came out of beta. Over the past six years that mobile apps have grown to be an essential part of not only the online experience but the overall educational experience for students at UCF.

In 2014 we recognized the need to understand better how students were interacting with Canvas while on-the-go and we conducted our first Canvas Mobile App survey at UCF. The study is critical because it gives us a better understanding of how students are interacting with the most popular mobile app at UCF and help us better communicate needs directly to Instructure and the Canvas Mobile team. In 2018 we completed our fifth Canvas Mobile App survey which I want to share with the community to create discussion, inform your mobile strategy, and help improve the experience for students.

Survey Background

The survey was administered April 1-8 inside of Canvas as a global message to all users. We have found that this messaging feature is handy, but needs to be used sparingly to avoid overloading the user.

280045_pastedImage_6.png

The survey this year included a record number of users (1688), and we suspect this might be to the addition of global messages being available on iOS for the first time. In the past, this was only available to web users and the smaller subset of Android users.

280064_pastedImage_7.jpg

Demographics

At UCF we are BIG and this includes a large diverse student population of over 66k. The following charts give a breakdown of the demographics behind the 1688 student responses. 

280065_pastedImage_9.png

280067_pastedImage_11.png


App Usage

App usage has been high at UCF since 2014 with very little change in usage, which is very high. In other studies, mobile app ownership is approximately 3:1 iPhone over Android devices. This survey was mostly in line with ownership. One interesting fact is that 3% of student reported both Android and iOS. 

Outside of this survey, our Canvas Data shows approximately 20% of all Canvas traffic is through the Canvas Student app, which includes over 500 million page views and 40k unique users per month. 

280068_pastedImage_13.png

The following question is always interesting because the biggest reason why students didn't use the Canvas Student app was they didn't know it was available. This used to be a more significant issue, but when smart banners were added to Canvas in 2014, we noticed that adoption jumped up significantly. 

280069_pastedImage_14.png

This survey and our previous have proved that student who use the Canvas Student app, use it a lot. In fact, 96% use it at least once a week with the majority (87%) using it even more. It's the most used app at UCF just in front of the popular UCF Mobile app at 84%. 

280070_pastedImage_15.png


Features

Since we started this survey in 2014, this hasn't changed much. Students generally want to know three things: 

  1. How am I doing in class?
  2. What do I need to do?
  3. How do I do it?

The survey shows that students are using the mobile app for light interaction and staying connected to their class while on-the-go. 

280071_pastedImage_17.png

In 2016 we added the following question to learn even more about how students use the Canvas apps, and this is in line with my statement above about what student generally want to know and how their interactions a light. There isn't a lot of interaction around assignments, discussions, or quizzes. These features are being used to get more information about a particular assignment, but not to submit one.

280072_pastedImage_18.png

The favorite features have a lot of similarities to the most popular features like grades and assignments. Thought it's interesting to see how the app gives access and is convenient and easy. I am particularly interested in the word "check" which shows student value being able to stay connected with short interactions. 

280082_pastedImage_33.png

Device Access

Which devices students own and how they access Canvas is essential as we continue to manage resources and support users on all platforms. One interesting point that has become common in recent surveys is laptop/desktop ownership is slightly less than smartphones. The 2018 survey is no different with 12 students reporting not owning a computer, with only four not owning a smartphone. 

280075_pastedImage_21.png280074_pastedImage_22.png

When I discuss these surveys I always say that usage doesn't equal importance, and it's no surprise that laptop/desktop is extremely important to students, with the smartphone in the middle, and tablet way behind at 11 percent. 

280076_pastedImage_23.png

If you take extremely important and very important to one data point, the smartphone is essential to almost 3/4th of the students in the survey with the tablet still well behind. 

280081_pastedImage_32.png

Communication

Communication through mobile technologies is often known as "non-traditional" but from our recent survey its obvious this is becoming less true as students reported push notifications (70%) to be more important than email (66%) with the more traditional SMS at 29%. 

280078_pastedImage_29.png

280080_pastedImage_31.png

Final Words

I hope to dive more into these numbers over the next few months but would love to know what you think. Also, if you are interested in running this survey at your school, please let me know as I'd be excited to compare numbers. 

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8 5 1,323
Instructure
Instructure

For the most recent post on Canvas Parent 2.0, check out Canvas Parent 2.0 - Pre-Release Update.

 

--------------------------------------------

This here’s meant for the K-12ers in the house. HE folks are welcome to keep reading, but I bet you won’t find it very relevant.

I mentioned in my recent Canvas Mobile Update post that we’re going to improve everybody’s experience with the parent app by changing the way authentication works. This post will provide a deeper dive into what that means and what you can expect from the parent app in the coming months. It’s nothing scary; I just want to make sure everyone has a proper heads-up and a chance to ask questions.

The Problem

Let’s start with how things work today. Your institution handles parent accounts in Canvas in one of two (or both of these) ways:

  1. You provision parent accounts in Canvas -- likely as observers -- from your SIS or some other user import. In this case, you’re either using Canvas authentication or some other authentication system (LDAP, SAML, etc.) to allow parents to access Canvas. You probably also communicate with parents about how to access these things…maybe at back-to-school night, maybe in packets you send home with kids, maybe through email, maybe through snail mail, or whatever else. Provisioning is the method of choice for a lot of larger schools/districts.

    AND/OR

  2. You enable self-registration for observers in Canvas. In this case, you tell parents to go to ‘yourschool.instructure.com/login/canvas’ to create an account for themselves. This option enables a little button on the Canvas login page that says:
    self-registration button picture
    Self-registration is the method of choice for a lot of smaller schools/districts.

In both cases, you end up with parents as users in Canvas. Cool! That means parents can engage in their kids’ education and you can facilitate that engagement depending on the policies and preferences of your school or district.

Okay, now less cool: We created an entirely different user model for the parent app when we launched it two years ago. There were good reasons for it, like wanting registration for parents to be easy from a mobile device -- and wanting parents with kids at different institutions to have an easy way to navigate between those kids/institutions. But in the end, this other user model:

  • Doesn’t play nice with SIS integrations
  • Doesn’t play nice with Canvas services like inbox
  • Means parents (at least until we added support for observer authentication in the fall of 2016) needed two Canvas accounts – one for web and one for mobile
  • Necessitates all this duplicate tooling like Canvas Parent Admin Tools and a Canvas Parent feature flag to manage mobile parents separately because Canvas Parent Users aren’t technically Canvas users
  • Made the first-time experience for parents worse

That all stinks. And that stench totally outweighs the theoretical benefits of having a separate model for parents.

-------------------

The Fix

 

In case the solution isn’t obvious yet: we’re going to get rid of the Canvas Parent user model and everyone’s going to authenticate in the parent app with their ordinary Canvas credentials (just like students and teachers do in the apps today). Here’s what the current release plan looks like:

Version 1.3

  • When: Likely the second half of April
  • What it does: Removes the “Create Account” button from the parent app’s login page
  • What parents can expect:
    • Won’t change anything for existing users.
    • Brand new users will need to have Canvas observer accounts to log in to the parent app.
  • Why: Since we’re getting rid of the Canvas Parent user model this summer, we’re removing the ability to create accounts that won’t work a few months down the road. Instead, new parents will need to be Canvas observers.

 

Version 2.0

  • When: In July, when parent app usage hits its lowest point
  • What it does:
    • Forces observer authentication to use the parent app
    • Likely gets rid of Canvas Parent Admin Tools and Canvas Parent feature flag (because they duplicate other Canvas admin functionality)
  • What parents can expect:
    • Will need to log into the app again, this time using their Canvas observer credentials, following the same flow they would to log into Canvas web or the student app (No more having two accounts!)
    • Any kids they’re observing will automatically populate once logged in (No more re-adding students you’re already observing in Canvas web!)
  • Why: To make everyone’s brains hurt less

-------------------

Here’s a picture of the change:

1.0 vs 2.0

 

If you have any questions, fire away!

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12 37 4,896
Instructure
Instructure

Version 6.0 of the student app has been in the wild for a few weeks, and I wanted to give an update on what you can expect from the Canvas mobile apps over the next few months.

CANVAS STUDENT

We’ll continue releasing feature updates to Canvas Student through the rest of this school year, in roughly this order:

  • Version 6.1: New, shiny, and performant course announcements and discussions!

Announcements and discussions are two of the most-used course components in Canvas, and both our iOS and Android teams have been working for weeks to make them more usable and more scalable in mobile.

One of the tricky things about discussion threads in mobile is that they can get really long, really quickly. They can also contain loads of images. And while your four-year-old laptop may have a paltry 8GB of RAM, your brand new iPhone X only contains 3GB of RAM. But you need both of those devices to load the same amount of information in about the same amount of time. So that was one of our goals. Here’s how an image-heavy discussion thread looks in the store version today compared to version 6.1:

271525_Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 11.01.37 AM.png

To sum it up, replies load more quickly and the interface isn’t so cramped. The reply button in old discussions was also really easy to miss. See it in the top right? Well, a lot of people didn’t. So we added a big and loud “Reply” button at the bottom of the original post (and one less loud one at the top right of the original post).

  • Version 6.2: New, shiny, and performant grades and assignments lists!

The old grades and assignments lists took a long time to load. This update will make them better.

  • Version 6.3: New, shiny, and performant assignment details and submission flows!

Viewing and submitting assignments from the student app today isn’t easy. We want to improve three things:

  1. Make grades and submission comments easy for students to access
  2. Allow students to see their submission, submission comments, rubric and annotations in a single place
  3. Make submitting assignments in mobile less of a pain in the butt

Here’s roughly what the new assignment details page will look like after a student receives a grade:

271526_Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 4.39.23 PM.png

We also have plans to add support for peer reviews and improve support for cloud assignments - though I’m not sure yet if those two pieces will go into 6.3 or a subsequent version.

CANVAS TEACHER

  • Version 1.5: Support for section-specific announcements, better discussions and faster context cards!

This should be released for both platforms within the next couple of weeks.

  • Other note: Teacher app doesn’t support modules today. We’re pretty close to being able to make this happen. Modules necessarily come last in development because almost every other kind of content in Canvas can be attached to a module (i.e., modules don’t do anything without assignments and pages and quizzes and links and files also being supported). Modules are also the way that many teachers interact with their course content, so getting to an assignment through the assignments list rather than through modules feels unnatural. Our first pass at modules will definitely not be adding support for building modules or modifying the structure of modules, as much as it will be viewing modules and module items. The basis for the teacher app’s success so far is its focus on course facilitation rather than course building or course structuring, and we’ll keep that theme going in however we incorporate modules.

    Version 1.5 is the last feature release for the teacher app we have planned on this side of InstructureCon, but we might be able to squeeze some other stuff in.

CANVAS PARENT

  • Version 2.0: Better authentication for e’rbody!

    Today, the first-time user experience in Canvas Parent is no good. The login process is convoluted, and once you log in, you still need to add a student before you can use the app -- even if you log in as an observer already connected to a student in the web. What’s worse, if your first-time experience in a mobile app stinks, you’re much more likely to delete the app than you are to keep using it.

    Generally, parents who get past that first-time experience use the app and it works well. But some parents want to see submission details, and some parents want messaging with teachers, and both of those things are technically impossible with the way authentication works today.

    We’ve found that virtually every K-12 institution either imports observers from their SIS or otherwise allows self-registration for observers. Either way, parents have an observer account in Canvas if the institution allows it. So we’re going to run with that and make everyone’s brains hurt less.

    In version 2.0, parents logging into the parent app will:
    1. Find their school
    2. Enter their observer credentials
    3. Land in the app with their students already connected

If you can’t picture it, this is the difference we’re talking about between login pages:

271529_Screen Shot 2018-03-23 at 11.29.12 AM.png

And while simplifying that experience is awesome, this change will also make the app more stable and much more scalable for future development (like adding messaging or viewing submission details).

MOBILE PAGE VIEW REPORTING


Last but not least, we’re making page view reporting from mobile a real thing. Today, we report mobile activity through API calls made from the apps. Those API calls are really hard to use in tracking activity, because a single page in mobile may require four calls, or it may require none. Instead, we’re going to fit mobile into the web URL paradigm to make reporting easier. For example, if a student enters a course from the iOS student app, we’ll report that they went to “https://[account].instructure.com/courses/[courseid]” from "Canvas Student iOS" rather than showing all the calls we made loading that course’s homepage.

----------------------

Stay tuned! App updates incoming!

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20 15 2,967
Surveyor

One of the most difficult things online educators have is to keep up with the changes in technology, especially mobile. One of the biggest challenges that my team and I have had to overcome is making sure that whatever we design for our faculty and students will be accessible in a mobile environment. We have gone through many iterations of templates to see what will work for all of our users.

 

We finally came up with using tabs. It seems that all of our faculty and students like the fact that they no longer have to page through many different pages to get all of the content needed to complete their assignments. By adding tabs on a single page, all of the information is there. The bonus is that tabs on a mobile device look great. 

 

Image on Canvas

270808_tab1.PNG

 

Image from iPhone

270809_mobile_tab.PNG

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2 1 126
Community Member

It has taken some time to encourage students and faculty to use mobile apps when accessing our Canvas instance, but we have made a lot of progress. This push came after we encouraged users to use the Calendar feature in their mobile devices. Our curriculum revolves around class calendars, and they needed a convenient way to access all the events in their classes. This has been a tremendous success, they can even access assignments and download attachments posted in the calendar through their phones and tablets.

Now it might be time to push for the use of mobile devices for other components inside Canvas. We recently acquired the Canvas video solution Arc, and students may be consuming these videos in mobile devices and not so much on PCs.

Regarding notifications, we have seen students turning them off more and more, they find this feature a little annoying, I find it useful though.

I want to know more about the Canvas mobile options and features, I will be doing more research on this and hopefully I will be able to share with all of you.

Thank you.

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1 1 137
Community Coach
Community Coach

269002_student-maddie-quote22.jpg

My colleague ashley.salter@ucf.edu and I conducted a number of face-to-face interviews with students about their experience using mobile technology to support their learning, with a particular focus on the Canvas Student App. These interviews helped us better understand the impact of this app and direct our communication to Instructure and Canvas Community. In the second of a series of blog posts from UCF, here is the story of Maddie.

Maddie is all about UCF and bleeds black and gold. Both her parents graduated from UCF, and she is very active on campus as a social media coordinator and the Director of Black & Gold Studios. In addition to her many activities, Maddie is also a junior studying Communication & Conflict with a Legal Studies Minor.

“The mobile app provides me ease of access when communicating with my instructors and peers on the spur of the moment.”

Maddie is a very involved student with a full-time course load, on-campus employment, and extracurricular activities. She is part of an academic program that is offered entirely online, although that was not her deciding factor in choosing her major. Maddie is highly involved with social media presence and would feel helpless without her smartphone. She states she can go more than a week without her laptop computer but couldn’t imagine life without her phone.

“I use the calendar feature on the Canvas Mobile app to organize my life week by week. I know what is due and when it’s due in one place."

Like most UCF students, the most frequent feature Maddie uses within the Canvas Student app is grades. She checks her grades often and benefits from the notifications that occur when assignments are graded. Another frequently used feature is the calendar as she utilizes each week to keep track of what assignments and important dates are coming up. Being able to track this from a centralized location while on-the-go rather than searching individual lists or checking the syllabus is vital to keeping her on task.

“The more reminders and notifications Canvas can give me the better I can stay on top of my school work.”

Maddie considers the notifications she receives as quite helpful. However, she doesn't activate the discussion posts or comments as those can be overwhelming. She prefers to receive grades, assignment feedback, and message notifications as they are necessary to maintain her academic success. Maddie feels that the communication taking place from on-the-go instances are important for students like her to stay on top of their work. Being able to communicate almost instantly with her professors or other classmates helps her feel engaged and informed.

“I finished my discussion post while waiting to board my flight!”

Without a smartphone or mobile device in general, Maddie feels her life would be more complicated. She uses a smartphone for more than just communication. She’s used her phone for recording interviews, taking photos, and being able to research with ease. Maddie feels that the Canvas Student app helps with distance learning. She has used it in several situations, such as submitting a video for a Spanish class or submitting discussions posts, where she believes it's almost faster to complete on the mobile device rather than on a laptop. She even used the discussion feature while waiting to board a flight when she realized she needed to respond to a post.

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11 0 664
Explorer II

This semester, I challenged myself to only use Teacher when grading and providing feedback. The release of Canvas Teacher got me like:

tl;dr Overwhelmingly positive.

Context

The course I am (was, by the time some of you may be reading this) teaching is Foundations of Online Learning. It needed a redesign, so my focus was on mobile-friendly Universal Design for Learning concepts and OER content. One discussion per week and assignments that made use of design choice including Adobe Spark, Canva, FlipGrid and other non-traditional assignment submission types.

As an eight-week course, and with a full-time job during the week and little spare time outside of work (tbh, I'd rather hang out with my family than grade all the time), it was important to me to find balance.

Being up earlier than the rest of my family, that meant that I could grade assignments that came in on Monday on Tuesday morning, and be caught up and ready to go for Tuesday submissions on Wednesday. The variety offered to me for providing on-the-go comments with my iOS camera and microphone, or annotating with DocViewer, were really stellar. I could do all of that while laying down on the couch in my jammies, rather than trying to prop a MacBook Pro on my lap with cats running around.

Highlights

  • Grading anytime, anywhere. I graded assignments in the early morning with a cup of tea, in between takes at band practice and before bed. All on different devices, as the situation warranted.
  • Editing announcements and assignments on the fly: Based on feedback from the students, I was able to flex Teacher's muscles by adapting course content to meet their needs.
  • Ran into an issue with drag and drop on iOS 11. Support was incredibly responsive and the issue was resolved.

Sticking points

  • Notifications for Teacher did not seem to work. I relied on notifications from Student.
    • If I did not have the Student app, notifications would not have pushed to me. It could have been a potential problem, but was resolved using a workaround.
  • No support for adding images to assignment submissions as a teacher. Had to go to mobile Canvas via Chrome for iOS. Bummer.

Many, many thanks to the team at Instructure for getting Teacher out to the community. Every opportunity I get to evangelize it, I do. I encourage everyone in this community that also teaches to try a similar experiment. Not only is it worth it, I now have a better sense of how to be more responsive to faculty concerns about the mobile Canvas experience.

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13 15 2,037
Community Member

Hi all,

I just finish the 'Mobile Series' quest videos, and I'm wondering if all of the information and functions presented in the videos are still accurate and valid... see below. Can anyone advise?

Quest Details - Mobile Series

Thank you!

Sincerely,

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2 2 150
Community Coach
Community Coach

If you joined us at InstructureCon 2017‌ for Canvas Mobile, An App for Everyone, thanks for joining me. If not, I wanted to make this available for everyone. The presentation is attached. 

This session covers the parent, student, and teacher roles when using the Canvas Mobile apps. This includes a short overview of 23 interviews by myself, Kristin Lundstrum‌, and Ashley Salter‌. We plan to share more of these interviews over the next few months in this space. 

As part of the presentation, we showed using an iPad Pro with the Apple Pencil to do annotations in SpeedGrader, which is available below:

SpeedGrader in Teacher App with iPad Pro - YouTube 

Session Video:

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13 7 1,611
Community Advocate
Community Advocate

Recently, I was given a new toy to play with: Canvas LMS. To be honest, it's not Christmas unless something tech is involved. My institution is currently piloting Canvas (currently using Bb) and I'm in the first batch of classes to go live. After reviewing the online instructor on-demand course and video tours, I dug into the platform to play around. Yea! Fun times...

(Canvas) Getting to Know You

My initial goal was to set up the course as an instructor with basic technology skills. It was bare bones but had the structure and support materials it needed to be functional. Another goal of the minimal design was to easily break apart materials from a condensed Summer course and expand it into a full-term Fall/Spring build.

[Design 1] Module Structure Outline

  • Module/Chapter Overview [Page]
    • Introduction
    • Learning Objectives
    • Tasks/To-Do List
  • PowerPoint slides in PDF (3 per page with notes) [File]
  • Optional Resources [URL Links]
  • Discussion/Assignment/Quiz [Add Item to Module]

Jeff Ferner asked Who stares at a phone all day... Who me? I stare at a desktop most of the day. Except when I am not at work and am then tethered to my iPhone SE (I have small hands). On an auditing whim, I decided to check out my newly designed course via the Canvas iOS mobile app. I soon thereafter redesigned the "basic" course.

I used both my iPhone SE and decently sized iPad to test out Design 1 of my course. One of the biggest issues that I had is when you add URL links to a Module, if you look at it on mobile- it looks good because of the inline reader (whether I use "Open in New Tab" or not).  However, in desktop with our previous best practice of opening links in new windows- at the very top of the screen it has a basic link telling the user to open in a new window. Meh.

Example of Module URL Open in New Tab
If I add a URL to a Module and do not put "open in a new tab" users may receive an error about secure/insecure data and web browsers. While I (and most tech savvy folks) know what that's about, for those that are not- it may create apprehension towards clicking on these links. Not a good user experience.

While in general one might say designing for mobile is the way to go- we have a lot of students who use their laptops for viewing course materials (which could be related to historical sub-par mobile access/user experience). Therefore, the current focus is to try and design for both at the same time.

[Design 2] Module Structure Outline

  • Module/Chapter Overview [Page]
    • Introduction
    • Learning Objectives
    • Tasks/To-Do List
      • Optional Resources [URL Links]
  • PowerPoint slides in PDF (3 per page with notes) [File]
  • Discussion/Assignment/Quiz [Add Item to Module]

Did a real quick redesign so that the URL links for the module were included within the "Module Overview" page. For desktop and mobile, they both open in a new tab. No error messages. While this is a simple way to address this concern, my next step is to do some mobile testing using requirements and prerequisites. What have been your experiences and tricks/fixes for designing for mobile/desktop at the same time?

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Surveyor

I have loved using Canvas, the switch has basically guaranteed student success. Students can turn in work from phones, use cameras to document project based learning assessments. When students are sick they return with all work and lessons complete. My students walk into the classroom, look at pop-up notifications and know exactly what to do, and what we will be doing in class that day. I love this!

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