cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
everson_50
Surveyor

A question about quizzes and the grade book

Jump to solution

Hi Everyone,

I'm very new to Canvas, and I'm struggling with how to set something up in my course site.

Our college is mandating that we do a pre- and post-course assessment with our students.  I teach statistics, and I have a short 10-item multiple-choice pre-test I ask my students to complete (during the first week of classes) and then they complete the same assessment again right before the final exam.

I need a way of motivating my students to complete these assessments.  In the past, the assessments were given online, and I essentially gave students full credit toward two lab activities if they completed the assessments.  I also gave students extra points on the post assessment for each question they got correct.  It was very easy for us to set this up and do it within our older LMS, but I'm finding it hard to figure out how I can easily do this within Canvas.

I am fine with NOT giving out any extra credit for completing the post-test, especially if we'd need to set up something that would require manually entering grades into the grade book, especially since we have 1000+ students who take this course each semester.

I'm essentially looking for a way to give my students a certain amount of points simply for completing these tests (e.g., if they complete a test, that can count as 10 points toward a lab assignment grade), while still being able to download some kind of report that will show me how many questions the students actually got correct on each item on the pre- and post-test.  Is this even possible?  If I set up a graded quiz, the actual number correct on the quiz will end up being the grade in the grade book, and we don't want to penalize students if they do not do well on these quizzes.  The quizzes are meant for us to gather information on whether we are meeting the course learning objectives.

I hope this makes sense.  In the end, perhaps I just need to set up practice quizzes and do my best to encourage students to take them, without giving any extrinsic motivators.  Still, however, I'm not sure if I can eventually download all the data I need from the practice quizzes since that information will not enter into the grade book.  Will it be possible for me to download summary statistics related to practice quizzes so I can report to the college on the problems students struggled with?

It looks like I can also set up a graded survey, but then again, it does not appear to me that this will give information to us about the percentage of students who correctly answered each item (even though it would allow us to give a straight 10 points for completion of the survey).

Thank you for your help!

1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
Stefanie
Community Team
Community Team

 @everson_50 ​, I know I'm not giving you the sort of answer you're looking for, exactly, but I wanted to share my experience with this. Last year my school also started mandating pre- and post-course assessments, administered just as you described: one at the very beginning of the term--it was the very first thing students saw, and we set up the modules so they couldn't even proceed in the course until they had completed it--and then once again, with the identical assessment being administered at the very end. The decision was made well above my pay grade to deliver them as graded surveys, so that actual scores on the survey didn't matter, and each contributed 2.5% to the final grade, for a total of 5% of the grade.

I was happy that this solution was set up for me, because, apart from communicating it to students in the syllabus and via announcements, I didn't have any further involvement--no grading, no grade adjustments, nor any workarounds were necessary. Perhaps you could implement something similar on your own?

View solution in original post

16 Replies
abunag
Surveyor

It sounds like "Practice Quiz" may meet your needs.  A practice quiz allows you to have right and wrong answers, but the students get full credit for completing it no matter how good (or bad) they did, and you can see the analytics on how they did.  And as long as you assign points to it, it will be part of their final grade.

Thank you, Anthony, but I'm not sure how to give points for practice quizzes.  In the Canvas instructor's guide, I read the following about practice quizzes--"A practice quiz can be used as a learning tool to help students see how well they understand the course material. Students do not receive a grade for practice quizzes, even though the quiz results display the number of points earned in the quiz. Practice quizzes do not appear in the Syllabus or the Gradebook."

Is there a way for me to set things up to give students credit for completing the practice quiz (and for that information to automatically be send to the Gradebook)?

 @everson_50 ​, a graded survey might work for this - How do I create a survey in my course?

Basically the students get full points just for completing/answering the questions. Otherwise the survey works pretty much the same as a quiz settings and questions wise.

Thank you, Kona.

The more I think about it, the more I feel I'm making this too complicated.

I can see how a graded survey will work, but it appears that if I set things up this way, students won't get to see information about exactly how many questions they got wrong, correct?  In the past, when our LMS was D2L, our students would at least get to see, in the grade book, what their actual scores were on the assessment.  We didn't release the questions or an answer key since our intent was to do a pre- and a post-test, but by seeing their scores, students at least got a sense of (a) whether--at the start of the semester--they already knew a lot coming into the course (and thus might be better served in a more advanced course), and (b) whether--at the end of the semester--they were as prepared as they could be for the final.  If students did poorly on the post-test, we would encourage them to contact their TA to find out about the problems they missed.  Most students did not bother to do this, but we liked for them to at least have the option.

If students simply get 10 points for completing the survey, I worry a bit that some of them will get confused about what that 10 actually means.  However, it doesn't seem like there would be an easy way to show them exactly how they did, if this is set up as a survey.  If it's set up as a practice quiz, I would assume they could see their scores at the very least, even if we did not release the answer key, but that brings me back to the issue of how I could easily give full credit to all students who take that practice quiz, regardless of how they perform. 

I hope this is making some sense!

 @everson_50 ​, all I can tell you is that I administered these pre- and post-tests to nearly 100 students and not a single one was confused by any of it. They simply received full points for having received it, and believe me, they wouldn't complain about receiving full points for activities that they didn't need to study for and that automatically contributed 5% to the overall course grade.

FWIW, here's the verbiage I put in my course syllabus:

Pre- and Post-Tests: You will complete a pre-test at the very beginning and a post-test at the very end of the course. You will be asked to complete the questions in these assessments to the best of your ability. The assessments will be used by the faculty to find out how well the learning

objectives for the course are being met. Wrong answers will not count against you; you will earn full points simply by completing the pre- and post-test assignments by the due dates. Therefore, please do not use any external aids such as notes or textbooks. You will have 30 minutes to complete each assessment. Due to the format of these assessments, they must be completed by the deadline. No extensions or makeups will be granted for these assessments—but again, keep in mind that simply completing them automatically gives you full credit.

This is the very first page that appeared in the first module, directly before the pre-test:

READ THIS FIRST: About the Pre-Test

The Humanities Department at Florida SouthWestern State College has created a pre-test and a post-test that you will complete at the very beginning, and again at the very end, of this course.

Please complete the questions in the following pre-test to the best of your ability. The results of the assessment will be used by the faculty to find out how well the learning objectives for the course are being met. Wrong answers will not count against you; you will earn full points simply by completing the pre-test assignment by the due date. Therefore, please do not use any external aids such as notes or textbooks. You will have 30 minutes to complete the assessment.

Due to the nature of this assessment and data collection process, you must complete the pre-test by the posted due date. No extensions or makeups will be granted for this assessment—but again, keep in mind that simply completing it automatically gives you full credit.

If you have never taken a quiz in Canvas before, here's a link to the lesson in the Canvas Student Guide that explains how to take a quiz in Canvas: How do I take a quiz? [n.b. this links to the old guides]

Click on the Next button at the bottom right of this page to proceed to the Pre-Test.

(Note: If you are reading this after the due date posted for this activity, you will be unable to complete the Pre-Test, as the test is now locked.)

And similar instructions appeared in the header for the quiz:

Please complete the questions in this assessment to the best of your ability.  This assessment will be used by the faculty to find out how well the learning objectives for the course are being met. Wrong answers will not count against you; you will earn full points simply by completing this assignment by the due date. Therefore, please do not use any external aids such as notes or textbooks. You have 30 minutes to complete the assessment.

Since students had all of this direction and guidance, everything went smoothly.

Thank you for all of this great detail, Stefanie.  I might need to "borrow" some of your syllabus language, if you don't mind!

In playing around a bit more with Canvas and testing some things out, it appears to me that while I can get some student analysis, I cannot get an item analysis if I set up a graded survey.  I can only get that if I set up graded or practice quizzes.  I might be wrong about this, but if we cannot easily look at statistics by item, I'll need to go another route altogether.

I have some ideas about things that might work, at least until I become more adept at using Canvas.  I really appreciate your feedback and help with this!

 @everson_50 ​, I already posted this on your other question about this issue, but to close the loop on it, here's what I found.

I went in and did some more testing/looking and I was able to see the breakdown of what percentage of students choose each answer option on the main quiz/survey statistics page - so as soon as I clicked on the "Survey Statistics" button.

SurveyStatistics.jpg

Yet, I will say that I was not able to get the item analysis for the survey, so I apologize for misleading you on that. Yet, there is an easy work around for it. Go into your test instance of Canvas (after the survey has been taken and it's been updated to test - How do I access the Canvas test environment?​ ) and in the settings change it from a graded survey to a graded quiz. This will then give you ALL the analytics of a graded quiz. The best part is that since you're doing it in your test environment your real course and students won't have any idea that you did it and won't be changed/impacted at all! Smiley Happy

Thank you, Kona! This really does help a lot.

Dr. Michelle Everson

Department of Statistics

The Ohio State University

415 Cockins Hall

1958 Neil Avenue

Columbus, OH 43210

614-292-3593

everson.50@osu.edu

Stefanie
Community Team
Community Team

 @everson_50 ​, I know I'm not giving you the sort of answer you're looking for, exactly, but I wanted to share my experience with this. Last year my school also started mandating pre- and post-course assessments, administered just as you described: one at the very beginning of the term--it was the very first thing students saw, and we set up the modules so they couldn't even proceed in the course until they had completed it--and then once again, with the identical assessment being administered at the very end. The decision was made well above my pay grade to deliver them as graded surveys, so that actual scores on the survey didn't matter, and each contributed 2.5% to the final grade, for a total of 5% of the grade.

I was happy that this solution was set up for me, because, apart from communicating it to students in the syllabus and via announcements, I didn't have any further involvement--no grading, no grade adjustments, nor any workarounds were necessary. Perhaps you could implement something similar on your own?

View solution in original post