cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Highlighted
Surveyor

How can >50 students collaborate to write a reading list?

Jump to solution

Rather than giving my students a set reading list for each week of my course, I'd like to let them collaborate to make one themselves. I created a Google Doc for each week containing three suggestions to start them off. But I have just read that Google Docs only allows 50 students to be added to the collaboration, and I have about 100 enrolled!

Does anyone have any ideas how else I could make this work? If there's a very simple answer I'm missing I'd be glad to hear it. I'm new to Canvas and rather clueless. Thanks!

1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
Community Coach
Community Coach

e.miles@sussex.ac.uk, one idea is to go with Google Doc's, just not through Collaborations. Then provide the link in the course to the Google Doc and enable editing by anyone with the link. I've done this before for a whole College meeting (so 100+ people) and as long as everyone wasn't editing at the exact same time it seemed to work ok! Also, this way you're still getting the collaboration functionality, but don't have to worry about students not being able to access the Document. 

View solution in original post

4 Replies
Highlighted
Community Coach
Community Coach

e.miles@sussex.ac.uk, one idea is to go with Google Doc's, just not through Collaborations. Then provide the link in the course to the Google Doc and enable editing by anyone with the link. I've done this before for a whole College meeting (so 100+ people) and as long as everyone wasn't editing at the exact same time it seemed to work ok! Also, this way you're still getting the collaboration functionality, but don't have to worry about students not being able to access the Document. 

View solution in original post

Highlighted

This is perfect, thank you!

Highlighted

What a fun activity, e.miles@sussex.ac.uk‌!

I have participated in some group Google Doc writing activities with 100+ people, and that can definitely work.

Another possibility is to use a Padlet, which would allow students to upload images of book covers or other multimedia in addition to the text/link they want to share. It looks good, and you can then export the Padlet as a spreadsheet, so that each item students have added will be a row in a spreadsheet, which would make it easy for you to then turn it into whatever kind of final document you want to prepare based on their contributions. Here's an example of a Padlet in Canvas where people can contribute freely, no log-in or anything required:

Guestbook 

(That's a guestbook I made for InstructureCon; I just created a Padlet, and then used the Redirect Tool to include it in the Canvas space).

I really like Padlets as a way to share lots of graphics on a page; here's a Padlet I am working on right now for my Fall classes which has feedback / growth mindset graphics and links:

Feedback Resources Padlet 

Highlighted

Thanks for this suggestion too, Laura! I will definitely check Padlet out.