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kkershaw
Community Member

Math quiz

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How can I make a quiz where students can give fill in the blank answers including math symbols like square roots and fractions?

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James
Navigator II

 @kkershaw  

Canvas does not support anything other than plain text with fill-in-the-blank questions.

If you want students to be able to enter the mathematical content themselves, then you need to use an essay question. This will give them access to the Rich Content Editor, which has the equation editor in it. I've done this successfully with my College Algebra class and it's very quick to skim through them and grade them. Math teachers are very good at interpreting mathematical content.

It's good that math teachers are good at interpreting mathematical content, because essay questions are not auto-graded in Canvas. You are asking Canvas to grade an essay in a foreign language and it does not know how to do that. That foreign language is mathematics, but what it's looking at is actually LaTeX, which is a formatting language and filled with formatting codes like \sqrt{x+3} for √(x+3) or \sqrt[3]{x+3} for the cube root of x+3. The square root of x+3 can also be written as (x+3)^{1/3} or \left(x+3\right)^{1/3}. In plain text, it could be written as (x+3)^(1/3). It takes specialized software to interpret this and that software generally limits what people can enter. There are homework and testing packages that do this (an incomplete list includes MyOpenMath, WebWorks, WebAssign, and MyMathLab).

Fill-in-the-blank questions require that you list every possible answer you're willing to accept. As soon as you think you have everything covered, a student might enter (3+x)^(1/3) or (3+x)^(3^(-1)) or put a space after a parentheses.

Fill-in-the-blank questions are limited to text-only for a good reason. If people put LaTeX or other content into them, Canvas wouldn't be able to grade them.

The other possibility is to use multiple choice questions. You have the Rich Content Editor available to you when you create the question by clicking on the pencil near the right side of the response. As the content creator, you can format something mathematically and then because it's multiple choice, Canvas can grade it automatically.

View solution in original post

3 Replies
James
Navigator II

 @kkershaw  

Canvas does not support anything other than plain text with fill-in-the-blank questions.

If you want students to be able to enter the mathematical content themselves, then you need to use an essay question. This will give them access to the Rich Content Editor, which has the equation editor in it. I've done this successfully with my College Algebra class and it's very quick to skim through them and grade them. Math teachers are very good at interpreting mathematical content.

It's good that math teachers are good at interpreting mathematical content, because essay questions are not auto-graded in Canvas. You are asking Canvas to grade an essay in a foreign language and it does not know how to do that. That foreign language is mathematics, but what it's looking at is actually LaTeX, which is a formatting language and filled with formatting codes like \sqrt{x+3} for √(x+3) or \sqrt[3]{x+3} for the cube root of x+3. The square root of x+3 can also be written as (x+3)^{1/3} or \left(x+3\right)^{1/3}. In plain text, it could be written as (x+3)^(1/3). It takes specialized software to interpret this and that software generally limits what people can enter. There are homework and testing packages that do this (an incomplete list includes MyOpenMath, WebWorks, WebAssign, and MyMathLab).

Fill-in-the-blank questions require that you list every possible answer you're willing to accept. As soon as you think you have everything covered, a student might enter (3+x)^(1/3) or (3+x)^(3^(-1)) or put a space after a parentheses.

Fill-in-the-blank questions are limited to text-only for a good reason. If people put LaTeX or other content into them, Canvas wouldn't be able to grade them.

The other possibility is to use multiple choice questions. You have the Rich Content Editor available to you when you create the question by clicking on the pencil near the right side of the response. As the content creator, you can format something mathematically and then because it's multiple choice, Canvas can grade it automatically.

View solution in original post

kkershaw
Community Member

Thanks.

On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 2:02 PM stefaniesanders <instructure@jiveon.com>

brandon_gillins
Community Member

This is a late post but I would look at www.goformative.com. Goformative has all the features your looking for free. I think the numerical response may be a premium option. I can't remember because my school purchases goformative.  I use this website a lot being an online mathematics teacher. In addition, I just started using onenote to have students show me there work.