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Re-submission notification

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I "returned" over 50 individual student assignments (due to their assignment being incomplete) with a comment to complete the assignment and resubmit for a grade. Is there a way to tell when a student has re-submitted the assignment without going through all students each day? (I'm sure there is..I just can't figure it out...)

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Community Team
Community Team

marcie_balatico@notes.k12.hi.us​, I've only ever done this by assigning a grade to the first submission (and I accompany the grade with a submission comment on the order of "I will re-evaluate your grade after you resubmit the assignment"). When a student resubmits, the resubmission will trigger an entry on your To Do list.

If you're setting Due dates and Available until dates for the assignments, students will not be able to resubmit after the Available until (lock) date, and when you go through the SpeedGrader it will by default display the most recent submission (all of the submissions will remain visible to you). That's the manual approach you mentioned; the SpeedGrader will show multiple submissions in a dropdown at the right for students who have resubmitted, and of course, if you have a window between the Due date and Available until date, the submission will also carry a late designation at the upper right of the SpeedGrader and in the Gradebook.

Would entering a preliminary grade, subject to change, work for you?

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Community Team
Community Team

marcie_balatico@notes.k12.hi.us​, I've only ever done this by assigning a grade to the first submission (and I accompany the grade with a submission comment on the order of "I will re-evaluate your grade after you resubmit the assignment"). When a student resubmits, the resubmission will trigger an entry on your To Do list.

If you're setting Due dates and Available until dates for the assignments, students will not be able to resubmit after the Available until (lock) date, and when you go through the SpeedGrader it will by default display the most recent submission (all of the submissions will remain visible to you). That's the manual approach you mentioned; the SpeedGrader will show multiple submissions in a dropdown at the right for students who have resubmitted, and of course, if you have a window between the Due date and Available until date, the submission will also carry a late designation at the upper right of the SpeedGrader and in the Gradebook.

Would entering a preliminary grade, subject to change, work for you?

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stefaniesanders​, that's great advice! I never thought about assigning the grade so the resubmit would trigger a notification on my to-do list! Genius! Thank you!

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Yes, I could assign a preliminary grade. In fact, that may work best. I think giving the student a low grade may motivate him/her to resubmit more quickly. It's been over a week and I've only received a few assignments back with corrections....Thanks!

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marcie_balatico@notes.k12.hi.us​, that's great! I find that an actual grade is a great motivator for students... Smiley Wink

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Quick follow up question stefaniesanders (and all), my K12 teachers love the usage of default to 0 for incompletes that are still technically available (not locked) but are considered past due (though no points are taken off). They really don't like using the "To Do" list at all. Too many courses, too much jumping around. They work from the gradebook of a course and then move to another course. This presents a conflict of usage then. If they use the default to 0 they're setting up the need to use the "To Do" list or play a guessing game on whether or not students have re-submitted (or submitted for the first time). If they don't use default to 0, students think the four assignments they've done out of 15 possible assignments has set them up with a super nice grade to post on the fridge. Does anyone have any suggestions for such teachers? I personally just didn't grade until they turned in something worthy of grading but I was teaching adults in professional development courses. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!

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Community Coach
Community Coach

Honestly I just use the To Do list... not sure what's not to like about it. 🙂

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SHEBENE, I'm grateful for kona@richland.edu​'s response, because I've been scratching my head over that observation--"[Teachers] really don't like using the 'To Do' list at all"--for the last 12 hours. Personally, I think the To Do list is a lifesaver and am flummoxed by the notion that teachers wouldn't like it, so it was hard for me to wrap my brain around your question. But: when I read your further description--"too many courses, too much jumping around"--I wonder if what you're telling us is that they're working from their global To Do list. If they're already working from the Gradebooks of their individual courses, they're already at the course level, so why wouldn't they want to use the course-level To Do lists? When I teach multiple courses, that's my workflow: navigate to the home page of the course where the To Do list resides, and work from there. That eliminates the jumping-around aspect that seems to be a sticking point with your teachers.

Am I close? Smiley Happy

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I try to be as efficient as possible with everything I do and this is my preferred workflow as well:

...navigate to the home page of the course where the To Do list resides, and work from there.

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Okay, I'm convinced that they should look at that, so I'll check it out more closely and suggest it to the teacher in question. Wasn't the "To Do" list at some point less than accurate? Perhaps it gained some notoriety earlier and now teachers here don't trust it? (I'm trying to see why they might not want to use it also and potentially head off some resistance to the idea. If it has improved over the course of two years or so, that would be good info to have in my pocket.) Thanks for the responses.

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