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Community Member

Respondus Lockdown Browser

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We have a BYOD (70% Mac / 30% PC users) and tested Respondus Lockdown Browser with one teacher last year.  I would love to hear from others that use Respondus. Are you happy with the program? Does it work seamlessly on the Mac and the PC? Any concerns?

Is anyone else using another program?

Thank you,

Rita

5 Solutions

Accepted Solutions
Learner II

I have helped faculty with the Respondus Lockdown Browser for a few years now and have mixed feelings about it. I think some people hear about what it is developed to do and think that it is the cure all to online cheating, when it is a just another tool that when used in the right situation can help deter cheating. To me unless you are using Respondus in a lab setting on campus I don’t see the effectiveness of it. If you require a student to use Respondus outside of the lab setting, it only works on that one device and not the rest of the devices that are at their disposal (7 different internet capable devices in my house). So you can deploy Respondus outside of the lab setting and the student can have another desktop, laptop, smartphone, etc… right next to the device with Respondus running on it. I think utilizing other methods of online cheating such as pulling from questions banks, shuffling the answers, timed quizzes, essays, etc… should be looked at more closely from the beginning. 

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Community Member

We have had success with the LDB.  However, some instructors have had a hard time grasping the concept that it is best for a lab setting.  Some online instructors have wanted the students to download the LDB at home, but that does not prevent students from using phones, tablets, other students, etc.!  It does not necessarily prevent cheating in the home setting.

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Community Member

We are on a 1:1 initiative with Macs; we use Lockdown and I like it. Occasionally, a student has difficulty accessing quizzes with it, but it's a quick fix from the tech department.

I don't have students test outside of the classroom setting. As others have stated, it is not a 100% guarantee against cheating, no matter the testing environment—students can still use smart watches, cell phones, write their answers on the keyboard itself . . . or the old-school paper cheat sheets.

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Setting a timer, using random questions from a pool and such are surely helpful.  I am curious if the Lockdown browser helps get the point across that an exam is what it is: a test of comprehension and skill.  Has anyone received a note from a student saying they ran out of time and could not look up all the answers (??!!).

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Community Team
Community Team

KIENLER​, since this is more of an open-ended discussion than a right or wrong type question, would it be all right if I changed this from a question to a discussion? I've also added some tags to your question to make it more readily accessible in search results.

Learner II

I have helped faculty with the Respondus Lockdown Browser for a few years now and have mixed feelings about it. I think some people hear about what it is developed to do and think that it is the cure all to online cheating, when it is a just another tool that when used in the right situation can help deter cheating. To me unless you are using Respondus in a lab setting on campus I don’t see the effectiveness of it. If you require a student to use Respondus outside of the lab setting, it only works on that one device and not the rest of the devices that are at their disposal (7 different internet capable devices in my house). So you can deploy Respondus outside of the lab setting and the student can have another desktop, laptop, smartphone, etc… right next to the device with Respondus running on it. I think utilizing other methods of online cheating such as pulling from questions banks, shuffling the answers, timed quizzes, essays, etc… should be looked at more closely from the beginning. 

View solution in original post

Setting a timer, using random questions from a pool and such are surely helpful.  I am curious if the Lockdown browser helps get the point across that an exam is what it is: a test of comprehension and skill.  Has anyone received a note from a student saying they ran out of time and could not look up all the answers (??!!).

View solution in original post

Community Member

Hahahaha!!!

I don't think they get it. I teach Spanish and I want the kids to get lots of practice writing things properly. Sometimes I set up a practice set, where they have to write sentences as fill-ins. Initially, kids would take a screen shot of the correct answers, or just pull open a new tab, and on subsequent practices, just copy from one window to another. That's why I have LOTS of talks with them about what GOOD practice looks like AND my practices sometimes go into Lockdown, too. LOL

Community Member

We have had success with the LDB.  However, some instructors have had a hard time grasping the concept that it is best for a lab setting.  Some online instructors have wanted the students to download the LDB at home, but that does not prevent students from using phones, tablets, other students, etc.!  It does not necessarily prevent cheating in the home setting.

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Learner II

We feel like it just creates a false sense of security. It does a fairly good job at locking down that one particular machine, but it doesn't lock down their tablet, room mate's computer, phone, etc. We had it with our previous LMS but will not be keeping it after our transition year.

It's great in a proctored environment as the proctor's only have to watch for extra devices, but not for online at home secured testing.

To that end, I've heard that there is an eye-monitoring software that can be used to detect cheating when the student is off-site. It looks for the eyes to leave the screen for more than a couple seconds. I'm not very excited about using it, but the idea is rather fascinating.

Community Member

We are on a 1:1 initiative with Macs; we use Lockdown and I like it. Occasionally, a student has difficulty accessing quizzes with it, but it's a quick fix from the tech department.

I don't have students test outside of the classroom setting. As others have stated, it is not a 100% guarantee against cheating, no matter the testing environment—students can still use smart watches, cell phones, write their answers on the keyboard itself . . . or the old-school paper cheat sheets.

View solution in original post