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Community Member

Where should students add articles

What is the best way for students to be able to add articles that they find interesting that are related to the coursework? Can they upload articles via the modules or through files? Or should they just email me the article and I can add it?

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Community Team
Community Team

Hello, meganmccoy@ksu.edu Welcome  to the Canvas Community! Even though this isn't actually a question about Canvas, it's still one with which many educators here can most likely help you. Please let us know if your focus is https://community.canvaslms.com/groups/higher-ed?sr=search&searchId=e3a53560-dea4-48d6-8135-55dd76b2... or https://community.canvaslms.com/groups/k12?sr=search&searchId=3d2574f1-9d92-4995-862b-d77f3960f700&s...‌ so that we can share your question to the right group. And please take a moment to join the appropriate group by clicking on the group link and selecting Join Group from the Actions dropdown that appears at the upper right of the page.

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...and upon re-reading your question, meganmccoy@ksu.edu‌, I take back what I said and apologize: This is most certainly a question about Canvas.  :smileyblush:

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Community Member

I actually prefer adding articles through Discussions.  That way, students can also comment on articles they find interesting, or add related articles to existing articles.  Typically, I would ask students to post the article and why they think it is interesting to the discussion.  Other students are more likely to read an article if they have some idea why it is related, versus just the raw link or file.

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I agree with tbunag@pacific.edu‌. I would also use a discussion for this type of assignment. Although, another option is to allow students to edit a Canvas page (https://community.canvaslms.com/docs/DOC-3116?sr=search&searchId=89614320-9ae6-4cbc-815a-c7572525790...), but, if the assignment is for a grade, grading a discussion is much quicker than grading a contribution to a page. Smiley Happy 

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Community Member

Can you provide more detail?  Are you talking about a link to an article hosted somewhere else, or scans of articles, or something else?  Also, are they trying to show just the instructor, or the full class?

Students can't add anything to the files area of a course, and modules is just an organizational tool - there's no actual content there - it's just links to other parts of the course and provides the "next/back" buttons.  I don't believe students can add items to the Modules.  Just off the top of my head based on your likely use case, I'd suggest setting up a discussion board, and allow students to post their links there.  That also allows other students to leave comments about each link, all in one location that can be referred back to.

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Community Coach
Community Coach

Oooooooo, very good question meganmccoy@ksu.edu

I find Discussions to be a very useful tool for this purpose. You can create just a general discussion for this purpose, you could create a series of topic-specific  discussions, you can make them graded or ungraded, you can require students to paste entire article or snippets; or just paste a link and summarize. They are viewable by everybody. Students can share their discussion of the article. Much more! Discussions are very powerful, and often underutilized.

I have discussions where I send my students out on virtual field trips (or scavenger hunts) for information on specific topics. It is one of their favorite assignments.

There really is not another tool available in Canvas to support this activity.

Another trick I know a few people doing is to create and embed a Google Form in your classroom that prompts students for a link to the article, a title and brief description. The embed the accompanying Google Responses spreadsheet in a prominent location in the classroom (use the Redirect Tool) to load the spreadsheet as a course menu item), then students could regularly check the spreadsheet for articles of interest. You could tie assignments to these same articles - like a discussion of articles about a specific topic.

There are a lot of pedagogically sound reasons for including your students in course content development (which you already know or you would not have asked this question), and either of these methods would support that.

Here is a link to a great little video to introduce you to the Redirect Tool if you are unfamiliar: Canvas Redirect Tool - YouTube 

I hope this helps, and if you have further questions please just ask.

KLM

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Community Member

I really like kelley.meeusen@cptc.edu‌ 's suggestion of using a Google form! For an example of a Google Form in a Canvas page, I have one here in an open workshop I did at my school today:

Feedback: Laura PAINTs Canvas 

And for managing lists of links, I am a big fan of Diigo. You can link to a Diigo user's Library page, which can be a great way to share that content with students. Here's a list of the growth mindset articles that I've collected and annotated for their browsing and use; you could get students to submit not just the link but an annotation blurb on the Google Form as Kelley proposed, and then it would be a quick copy-and-paste from the form into your Diigo:

My Growth Mindset articles at Diigo

And while it takes a couple of steps, you can also have annotated Diigo links appear "live" in a Canvas course, as here:

Diigo: Laura PAINTs Canvas 

Another fun tool for bookmarking is Pinterest. My students like Pinterest. I've never really been able to get them to like Diigo... but I like Diigo, and I rely on that very heavily to collect and share resources back with the students. Here are the Pinterest Tech Tips I share with my students (I periodically try to get them excited about Diigo... but it never clicks with them the way Pinterest does):

Online Course Wiki / Pinterest Tech Tips 

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Community Coach
Community Coach

Hi there, meganmccoy@ksu.edu‌...

We haven't heard from you for almost two months since you first posted this question, so I thought that I would check in with you to see if you've had an opportunity to review the feedback you've gotten so far.  As others have already stated, this is a great question, and IMHO, it really doesn't have a "correct" response.  So, I am going to go ahead an convert it to a "Discussion" rather than a "Question" (questions usually have a "correct" answer).  If you're still looking for some ideas, please be sure to let members of the Community know by posting a message below.  Thanks Megan!  Looking forward to hearing from you soon!

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