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Learner II

Your ideas of Canvas' best kept secrets

Hi,

I am curious if you would please share your ideas for Canvas' best kept secrets. If you have a workshop coming up for faculty and you want them to say, "Wow, I didn't know you could do that," what would you share with them?  We are past the basics (e.g. embedding audio/video with the media comment tool).

Thanks in advance.

Julie

140 Replies
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Thank you, fernerj@erau.edu! That's an awesome feature, isn't it? I would think everyone would want to use it...but it's so well hidden. Smiley Wink

Oh, and if I recall correctly, SpeedGrader settings don't persist upon course copy, so you'll need to remember to set it up once at the beginning of every semester. Now that you know it's there, even if you forget to change the setting, you'll realize it immediately as soon as you navigate to your first grading task.

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Community Member

Does this sorting feature include if you are using rubric scoring and not grading? We don't care about our rubric "final grade" so we don't have the rubrics set to show those scores in SpeedGrader. If you have it set to "by submission status" will it notice that some have rubric scores and others do not?

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Community Member

Can you explain this one a bit more? I see this warning and would like to know what it really means:

Editing rubrics: In the same vein, when someone tries to edit a rubric that is already attached to more than one assignment, a scary warning message pops up. After you think a bit about what you're doing, you can generally ignore it and carry on.

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jen@kolodner.com​, while I can't speak to what that message really means or was intended to mean, I can certainly hazard my interpretation as to the message this warning is meant to convey. Any action to change a rubric will generate that warning message, and I believe it's meant to inform you that you're in the process of editing not only the rubric that appears on the page in front of you but also in other assignments as well. So whatever edit(s) you make could potentially have impact on (1) other assignments and (2) assignments for which you've already used the rubric for grading. That's why I said that in this case, since you're only making the edit so that you can have the rubric automatically populate the grade field, you can carry on through the warning message, as long as you've thought about it.

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Stefanie,  I have to add that the showing the instructors where the Grade with Rubric is on Discussion Forums is helpful. @https://community.canvaslms.com/docs/DOC-10187-4152724127   Faculty are so excited with the ease of grading with this addition.

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Thank you for mentioning that, tellison‌! Since we're talking about using rubrics to grade discussions, you might be interested in adding your vote and feedback to https://community.canvaslms.com/ideas/5749-display-discussion-rubrics-by-default 

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Even I often forget where this is -- I know it exists, but since I'm not in Canvas every day (GASP) I forget it's not as obvious as it is with assignments.

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Just to add to Stefanie's comment... We had several faculty members that were not interested in using rubrics at all. They felt that it was extra work having to recreate those rubrics in Canvas that they already had in Word documents. Once they realized how using rubrics would actually simplify and speed up grading for them, they were quick to get on board. Added to that, is James Jones's Canvancement for importing rubrics from a spreadsheet, and it is almost a no-brainer. Faculty are excited to use rubrics now.

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Community Coach
Community Coach

Yay! So glad james@richland.edu' Rubric Importer helped!

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Community Coach
Community Coach

I would say using some of the elements in the StyleGuide.  In your instance of Canvas, if you go to:

http://[InstititutionName].instructure.com/styleguide

...there are some elements there that you can use when designing your course(s) that will give your pages some nice elements...such as accordions, alerts, borders, tabs, etc.  You'll probably need to have a bit of experience with HTML, but some of the code isn't too terrible to figure out.  For example, over in the Instructional Designers group here in the Canvas Community, jperkins@instructure.com​ created an awesome blog entry called Using jQuery without Custom Javascript.  Another one that I've bookmarked is Tabs started by brad.hinson@ucdenver.edu. I've certainly learned a lot more just by participating in those threads, and I've even created a resource in our instance of Canvas for our instructors called "Canvas Labs" which gives instruction on how they can use code snippets I've grabbed from the StyleGuide, modify them slightly, and use them in their own course(s).