Books for SEL

VanessaParlier
Community Novice
0
1023

Book 1: Little People Big Dreams: Inspiring Writers By. Maria Isabel littlepeoplebigdreams.com/book/little-people-big-dreams-inspiring-writers/ 

This small book set introduces three women from different backgrounds who contributed works of literature that are widely known for their inspirational stories and lives. The age level of these books is 4-7 years old perfect for your young readers who are interested in historical people who made a difference. The multicultural representation in the books helps make all children feel seen and represented in the classroom.  These books introduce autobiographies in an easy-to-read format for young children

Book 2: A Bad Case of Tattle Tongue by Julia Cook 

Read aloud link:  https://vimeo.com/205971472 

A Bad Case of the Tattle Tongue is a great story for young kids who tattle for everything. This fun, colorfully illustrated book teaches children how tattling is not a good habit to have. The main character Tommy has a bad habit of tattling on peers and ends up losing friends and making people not like him. Throughout the book Tommy learns from the magical prince why he shouldn't tattle and what is okay to inform an adult about. The ages for this book are grades k-6th but geared more toward younger grades. 

Book 3: Wonder by R.J. Palacio  https://wonderthebook.com/books/wonder 

This award wining book taches children to see the beauty around them. As we navigate the challenges Auggie faces attending a public school for the first time and starting 5th grade we get to explore the different points of views and perspectives from those around him. This heartwarming book teaches kindness, empathy, acceptance, compassion, and friendship to young readers. Auggie isn't your average child, he has gone through various surgeries to correct craniofacial anomalies, trying to navigate a new life and school at the middle school age is challenging and frightening for him but he perseveres and overcomes all challenges he is faced with. Auggie learns to be true to who he is and embrace his differences and not let them define his happiness.